CDC officials were advised not to use terms like ‘evidence-based.’ The FDA chief uses them all the time

first_imgPolitics CDC officials were advised not to use terms like ‘evidence-based.’ The FDA chief uses them all the time Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Log In | Learn More What’s included? By Rebecca Robbins Dec. 20, 2017 Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. J. Scott Applewhite/AP A report that the Trump administration discouraged officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from using seven words — including “vulnerable” and “evidence-based” — in its budget submissions sparked outrage over the weekend in the scientific and public health community.It also got us wondering: How often — and in what context — do these words get used in other government agencies focused on health and science? GET STARTED Tags CongresspolicySTAT+White Houselast_img read more

Pharmalittle: Trump and senators push for drug prices in TV ads; Sanofi looks to spin off consumer business

first_imgPharmalot Top of the morning to you, and a fine one it is. We may have returned from a sojourn abroad, but we are enjoying another busy day, thanks to the first ever #STATSummit taking place today in Cambridge (Massachusetts, not England). All sorts of interesting people and topics are on hand, so take a peek if you are unable to join us. Of course, we also look forward to the cups of stimulation being served. Meanwhile, we are pleased to provide the latest menu of tidbits. Have a smashing day and do keep in touch.President Trump and senators from both parties are still hoping to force drug makers to disclose list prices in TV ads, The Hill reports. The disclosure rule was one of Trump’s highest-profile initiatives and the first policy released after the administration unveiled its drug pricing “blueprint” in 2018. But in July, a federal judge sided with a coalition of three drug makers and advertisers and blocked the Trump administration from implementing the policy. By Ed Silverman Nov. 21, 2019 Reprints What is it? Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. What’s included? Alex Hogan/STAT Ed Silverman STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Tags pharmalittleSTAT+center_img About the Author Reprints @Pharmalot Pharmalittle: Trump and senators push for drug prices in TV ads; Sanofi looks to spin off consumer business Log In | Learn More Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. GET STARTED [email protected] last_img read more

Covid-19 long-haulers and the experience of ‘hidden’ disabilities

first_img A dilemma for ‘long-haulers’: Many can’t prove they ever had Covid-19 [email protected] I have congenital scoliosis, a disease that kept me in the hospital for most of my childhood. I no longer use any mobility devices, but my misshapen torso and smaller-than-average height hint at my medical history. Because my disease isn’t immediately apparent, most people who meet me likely notice that something is different about me, but don’t realize that I look different because of a disability. Even those who do realize that rarely think about its nonmobility components, such as my reduced ability to clear respiratory infections like Covid-19.advertisement I vividly recall standing with one of my college mentors in front of an iron lung in the lobby of Boston Children’s Hospital. He told me how polio had led to the last disability revolution because people with the disease made the public aware of disabilities and fought for the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act.While the ADA was instrumental in protecting the rights of disabled individuals at school and in the workplace, its focus was on those with mobility disabilities, partially due to the large number of polio survivors who used aids like wheelchairs, canes, and braces. This growing population centered these mobility disabilities in culture to the point where a wheelchair became the universal symbol for disability.As important as it is to advocate for and support the physical accessibility of public and private spaces, an unintended consequence of these events is that disabilities that have nothing to do with mobility are often overlooked in discussions of disabilities and disability accommodation. This extends to medicine, where symptoms are often dismissed or underestimated because they are vague and difficult to characterize, leaving patients without adequate medical or social support.advertisement About the Author Reprints The Covid-19 pandemic is exposing this lack of widespread understanding and accommodation for individuals with nonmobility disabilities. First OpinionCovid-19 long-haulers and the experience of ‘hidden’ disabilities Long after the fire of a Covid-19 infection, mental and neurological effects can still smolder When I used a wheelchair, people often rushed to help me get up the stairs. Now they don’t consider, or initially understand, that I must wear an N95 mask just to see my friends. From my advocacy work in the disability community, I know that my experience isn’t unique.The link in the public’s mind between disability and mobility has led “hidden” disabilities, such as visual impairment or immunocompromise, often not being included in conversations about accommodation and support systems.The Covid-19 pandemic has made these misconceptions about what it means to be disabled even more evident. Since March, there have been calls to protect the most vulnerable people from Covid-19. In the wake of news of the tragic spread of Covid-19 in nursing homes, “vulnerable people” now generally means the elderly.While it is incredibly important to take care of older Americans, the importance of protecting those with hidden disabilities, such as my restrictive lung disease, who are similarly vulnerable to poor outcomes from Covid-19 get lost in the conversation.This is especially important when talking about populations who are young or thought of as generally healthy, because individuals with invisible disabilities are often included by default in low-risk groups. People in a store cannot see that my spine curls around my lungs and reduces my ability to fight respiratory infections. If my risk was visibly obvious, they might not argue or complain when I ask them to fix their masks. Related: By Harry T. Paul Oct. 7, 2020 Reprints The lack of discussion around hidden disabilities creates barriers for people experiencing invisible symptoms like pain or fatigue for which there is no provable medical etiology. As reported in The 1619 Project, the history of doubting patients stretches at least as far back as the beginning of slavery in the U.S. In the intervening centuries, before a syndrome or disease is categorized and accepted as “real,” patients with these symptoms have been written off. Chronic fatigue syndrome, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, and fibromyalgia are just a few examples.It is pivotally important to learn about hidden disabilities now as individuals affected by post-Covid-19 syndrome who need support and advice are having difficulty convincing physicians of their experiences, are facing significant depression and anxiety from the mental toll of this doubt, and are experiencing medical gaslighting. Although this has been portrayed as a phenomenon isolated to Covid-19, those who research, write, and report on post-Covid syndrome are missing the opportunity to highlight the long history of dismissing nonmobility disabilities, especially those that are poorly understood.Symptoms of post-Covid syndrome include chronic cough, trouble breathing, muscle pain and weakness, gastrointestinal symptoms, brain fog, and more, so it is easy to imagine the support these people need and how damaging unnecessary barriers can be. When seeking medical care, even those with stark symptoms are being required to prove they had Covid-19 with test results, despite the lack of access to testing. These individuals will face additional barriers as they seek accommodation in work, school, and their social lives.Clinicians are not usually accustomed to talking about states of disability for which there is no clear biomedical explanation or treatment plan. Most people are not accustomed to talking about the barriers that exist for people with nonmobility disabilities. I believe that both of these gaps stem from a lack of knowledge of what it means to be disabled, which can be fixed with education and discussion.A better understanding of hidden disabilities can improve patient care and accommodation practices in medical facilities, schools, businesses, and other public places. People would feel more comfortable asking their physicians for treatment for fatigue or pain. Workers could more easily ask their employers to change their desk chair, shift time, or work site to help them have the best experience in their career. Students could feel more comfortable asking schools for accommodations other than about the physical environment.The more we all learn and talk about what it means to be disabled, the more equitable our society can become.Harry T. Paul is a second-year M.D.-Ph.D. student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Related: Adobe Tags Coronavirus @_HarryPaul_ Harry T. Paullast_img read more

Drunk boater in Naples gives ‘poop deck’ new meaning…

first_imgAdvertisement NAPLES Fla. – A California man was arrested Sunday for Boating Under the Influence (BUI) near the Narrows in Collier County. Michael Doran, 57, of Los Angeles, was pulled over for a slow speed zone violation by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) around 1:30 p.m., according to the arrest report. Officers said, Doran smelled like alcohol and they saw multiple open alcoholic beverage containers near him. They say Doran was wobbling and slurring his speech. After conducting field sobriety tests officers determined Doran was drunk and charged him with BUI. He was placed in handcuffs and his boat was towed back to Hamilton Harbor and impounded. He refused a breathalyzer test. FWC announces license-free fishing days June 14, 2021 Immokalee youth program honors fallen FWC officer June 16, 2021 AdvertisementTags: BUIFWC RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 commentscenter_img Bear found wandering near Naples homes June 7, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Black bear found lounging inside Fort Myers business June 9, 2021 AdvertisementDoran was picked up from the boat and on his way to Naples Yacht Club when officers said he ‘urinated and defecated on himself’ in the vehicle. He was allowed to use the restroom again at the yacht club.Officers then took Doran to the Naples Jail Center. He is currently in custody with the Collier County Sheriff’s Office. Advertisementlast_img read more

Florida man arrested on 20 counts of child porn

first_imgRELATEDTOPICS Florida man pleads guilty to selling child abuse images online May 17, 2021 Cape Coral man arrested after child sexual abuse videos were found on his computer May 12, 2021 AdvertisementHe was arrested and booked into the Manatee County Jail where he is facing 20 felony charges for possession of child pornography. German police bust one of the world’s largest child sex abuse imagery networks May 4, 2021 AdvertisementTags: Child pornographyManatee County Port Charlotte man arrested on 10 counts of child pornography June 4, 2021 MANATEE COUNTY, Fla. – A Manatee County man was arrested Friday on 20 counts of child pornography after officials searched his Palmetto home. Odie Brock Ely, 43, is facing multiple charges of possession of child pornography after detectives with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) searched his home. FDLE along with the FBI executed a search warrant at the man’s home and found a number of disturbing images showing children being sexually abused. Investigators also found videos of children involved in sex acts on Ely’s computer showing some children younger than five years old, FDLE reported. AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 commentsDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 commentslast_img read more

Arcadia man sentenced to 14 years in prison on drug charges

first_imgMemorial service honors Arcadia store owner killed during robbery June 1, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments FORT MYERS, Fla. – An Arcadia man was sentenced to 14 years in federal prison Monday after pleading guilty to selling methamphetamine in September 2020. Michael Torres, 41, sold two ounces meth to an undercover law enforcement officer for $950 in December 2019, according to court documents. Torres then agreed to buy one kilogram of “ice,” a pure form of methamphetamine, from an undercover officer at a restaurant in Punta Gorda for $16,000 in June 2020. After the meeting, Torres was arrested and charged with possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine. Store owner dead after shooting in Arcadia May 20, 2021 Man arrested for killing Arcadia store owner during robbery May 21, 2021 AdvertisementTags: Arcadiaprison Advertisementcenter_img Arcadia taco truck attracts pilots from all over Florida June 16, 2021 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Advertisement RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementThe case was prosecuted by United States Attorney Michael V. Leeman.last_img read more

In Pictures: Government Minister visits local recycling manufacturing company in Laois

first_img Community In Pictures: Government Minister visits local recycling manufacturing company in Laois WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Council Facebook By Alan Hartnett – 7th February 2019 Laois was showered with Government ministers yesterday as they launched new plans and announced new jobs for the county.And one of them, Richard Bruton, Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment, took time out to visit a local Laois company that specialises in manufacturing recycling equipment.Established in 1997, LSM is an independent Irish company that provides industry-leading waste solutions to customers and distributors around the globe.All LSM machines are designed and manufactured at their facility in Portlaoise – which is where Mr Bruton visited.Speaking to LaoisToday about the visit, Operations manager Noel Graham, who owns the company along with John Cummins, said it was a very worthwhile experience.He said: “The Minister was in the area and Cllr Mary Sweeney contacted us to see if we would be interested in giving him a tour of our factory to show him what we do.“She facilitated the whole thing and Minister Bruton was very interested in what we do here as it is in his field.”LSM employees 35 people and has been in business for over 20 years.They have contracts with multi-national companies like Tesco, Glanbia and Statoil and are well established as a leading company in their field.Noel said: “The Minister was given a full tour of the factory and was shown how we manufacture all of the products that we produce.“I’m sure it was a worthwhile experience for Minister Bruton, Cllr Mary Sweeney and Fine Gael’s Thomasina Connell who were also in attendance.”Photographer Michael Scully was there and he captured some great pictures.Check them out below:Minister for Communications, Climate Actions and; Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D., and Noel Graham ( Operations Director- LSM ) during a factory tour at LSM Ireland, Ballyknocken, Portlaoise. Photo: Michael Scully.Noel Graham ( Operations Director LSM Ireland ) , Rayandrius Vaiciulionis and Minister for Communications, Climate Actions and Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D., pictured during his visit to LSM Ireland, Ballyknocken, Portlaoise. Photo: Michael ScullyMinister for Communications, Climate Actions and Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D. and Noel Graham ( Operations Director- LSM ) watch fabricator – Coenrad van der Merne, during the Minister’s visit to LSM Ireland, Ballyknocken, Portlaoise. Photo: Michael ScullyClr. Mary Sweeney, Minister for Communications, Climate Actions and Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D., Noel Graham ( Operations Director- LSM ) Claire Cummins ( GM LSM and Thomasina Connell, during the Minister’s visit to LSM Ireland, Ballyknocken, Portlaoise. Photo: Michael Scully.Minister for Communications, Climate Actions and Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D., pictured with staff at LSM Ireland , Ballymacken, Portlaoise during his visit. ( from left ) Claire Cummins ( GM – LSM Ireland ), Minister Bruton , Tracy Bergin, Sarah Mc Cann, Lisa Byrne, Noel Graham ( Operations Director- LSM ) and Sara Soares . Photo: Michael Scully.Minister for Communications, Climate Actions and Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D., chatting with Noel Graham ( Operations Director- LSM ) during the Minister’s visit to LSM Ireland, Ballyknocken, Portlaoise. Photo: Michael Scully.Minister for Communications, Climate Actions and Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D., watches as Noel Graham ( Operations Director- LSM ) demonstrates one of their balers, during the Minister’s visit to LSM Ireland, Ballyknocken, Portlaoise. Photo: Michael Scully.Minister for Communications, Climate Actions and Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D., pictured during his visit to LSM Ireland, Ballyknocken, Portlaoise, with Noel Graham ( Operations Director – LSM ). Photo: Michael Scully.Work carries on as Minister for Communications, Climate Actions and Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D., chats to Noel Graham ( Operations Director – LSM Ireland ) during his visit to LSM Ireland, Ballyknocken, Portlaoise. Photo: Michael ScullyMinister for Communications, Climate Actions and Environment – Richard Bruton, T.D., pictured during his visit to LSM Ireland, Ballyknocken, Portlaoise, with Thomasina Coinnell, Clr. Mary Sweeney, Laura Starnes, Noel Graham ( Operations Director – LSM ) and Claire Cummins ( GM – LSM Ireland ). Photo: Michael ScullySEE ALSO – In Pictures: Gaelscoil Portlaoise host annual Grandparents Day Laois secondary school announces scholarship winners for new academic year Pinterest Twitter New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening Twitter Previous articleAs LaoisToday celebrates its 2nd birthday we look back on the stories we had on site this day two years agoNext articleSinn Fein selects Cllr Aidan Mullins to run for May Elections Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. WhatsApp Facebook Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ TAGSLSMRichard Bruton Community Home News In Pictures: Government Minister visits local recycling manufacturing company in Laois News Pinterestlast_img read more

Russell: Succeeding in a brave new financial world

Ian Russell Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:55Loaded: 0.00%0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently behind liveLIVERemaining Time -3:55 1xPlayback RateChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window. This video is either unavailable or not supported in this browser Error Code: MEDIA_ERR_SRC_NOT_SUPPORTED Technical details : The media could not be loaded, either because the server or network failed or because the format is not supported. Session ID: 2021-06-13:6cb7c0809d20bb3eb24ba105 Player Element ID: vjs_video_3 OK Close Modal DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. read more

Queensland locking in more domestic gas

first_imgQueensland locking in more domestic gas Minister for Resources The Honourable Scott StewartQueensland-based energy company Comet Ridge has been given the green light for a new Bowen Basin based project which will see more gas made available for the domestic market.Resources Minister Scott Stewart said Queensland-based energy company Comet Ridge has been granted an Authority to Prospect over a 338 square kilometre parcel of land located in the gas rich Bowen Basin.“In the last 12 months the Palaszczuk Government has approved 10 new Authority to Prospect – half of which (1447 square kilometres of new land) have a domestic gas condition which requires any gas that’s found to stay in Australia,” Mr Stewart said.“The new ATP allows Comet Ridge to begin exploration for new sources of gas while utilising their existing gas infrastructure in the region to plug straight in and get gas to market faster.“The new Mahalo Far East project will invest about $5.5 million over six years into the state and local economies.“Supporting exploration in Queensland and maintaining a pipeline of resources projects means more gas for local industry and more jobs.“The resources industry has been essential during the COVID-19 global pandemic and will help continue Queensland’s economic recovery.”Comet Ridge Managing Director Tor McCaul said the Mahalo Far East block contains a very large gas in place volume and is an important upside addition to the Mahalo Hub area.“Combining these blocks and sharing one large development for the whole Mahalo Hub area will provide greater efficiency and scale economy, as well as a material injection of gas into the east coast market, at a critical time,” Mr McCaul said.“Importantly, a proportion of this Mahlo Hub gas is earmarked for the domestic market.”Since 2015 the Palaszczuk Government has released more than 80,000 square kilometres of land for gas exploration with almost a quarter of it guaranteed for the Australian domestic market.The Palaszczuk Government is also investing $5 million to investigate the feasibility of a physical 500km gas transmission pipeline to connect the Bowen Basin to the domestic and export markets. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australian, Bowen, Comet, director, efficiency, exploration, Government, industry, infrastructure, Minister, Palaszczuk, pipeline, QLD, Queensland, resources, Torlast_img read more

Artist Liz Pike creates new body work for Camas Gallery

first_imgArtist Liz Pike creates new body work for Camas GalleryPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Wednesday, February 26, 2020in: Community News, Peopleshare 0 Pike will present a one-woman show at Three Creeks Library in March CAMAS — Local artist Liz Pike will display a new body of work titled “Pike Pears” at Camas Gallery. She will also have several live painting demonstrations during the month of March at Camas Gallery, 408 NE Fourth Avenue in downtown Camas. Liz Pike is one of Clark County’s most prolific artists. In addition to new works at Camas Gallery, the public is invited to view another exhibition of her latest work in a one-woman art show at Three Creeks Library during the month of March. Image courtesy of Liz PikeLiz Pike is one of Clark County’s most prolific artists. In addition to new works at Camas Gallery, the public is invited to view another exhibition of her latest work in a one-woman art show at Three Creeks Library during the month of March. Image courtesy of Liz PikeArea enthusiasts can meet Pike and watch her paint rich colors in oil on canvas at a special Camas First Friday Art Walk reception on March 6 from 5-8 p.m., and during regular Camas Gallery hours from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sat., March 14 and Sat., March 28.  Pike is one of Clark County’s most prolific artists. In addition to new works at Camas Gallery, the public is invited to view another exhibition of her latest work in a one-woman art show at Three Creeks Library during the month of March. The library is located at 800 NE Tenney Road, Vancouver. Pike’s work will be hanging from Fri., March 6 through Tue., March 31 and may be viewed during normal library hours, Monday through Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and on Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.   Pike has a studio art gallery and an ART FARM Sip & Paint Studio at Shangri-La Farm in Fern Prairie, located at 26300 NE Third Street, Camas. For a complete calendar listing of all of Pike’s art shows throughout 2020, visit her website at LizPike.Art.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:CamasClark Countyshare 0 Previous : Vancouver community garden plot registration now open Next : Woodland Public Schools to participate in Reunification DrillAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more