The Results Are In! West End’s X Factor Musical I Can’t Sing! Announces Full Casting

first_imgThey’ve got the X Factor! Full casting has been announced for London’s new musical comedy and fictional X Factor spoof I Can’t Sing!. The show will feature Ashley Knight as boyband manager Louis, Victoria Elliot as pop queen Jordy, Simon Bailey as the host of X Factor and Billy Carter as Executive Producer. They will join previously announced Olivier Award winner Nigel Harman, Cynthia Erivo and Alan Morrisey. Performances for this quirky production will begin at the London Palladium February 27 with opening night set for March 26. 

I Can’t Sing! features choreography by Kate Prince, design by Es Devlin, lighting design by Jon Clark, sound design by Gareth Owen and musical supervision by Philip Bateman. London The cast will be rounded out by Simon Lipkin, Joe Speare, Katy Secombe, Charlie Baker, Shaun Smith, Rowen Hawkins, Luke Baker, Adam J Bernard, Jenna Boyd, Cyrus Brandon, Gabrielle Brooks, Scarlette Douglas, Kelly Ewins, Scott Garnham, Cherelle Jay, Faisal Khodaukus, Jaye Marshall, Brian McCann, Max Parker, Joseph Prouse, Steven Serlin, Kirstie Skivington, Philippa Stefani, Gary Trainor and Alex Young.center_img View Comments Directed by Sean Foley, I Can’t Sing! features music by Steve Brown and a book and additional lyrics by British comic Harry Hill. The production tells the story of Chenice (Erivo), who lives in an ITV blackspot because her grandad’s iron lung interferes with the signal in her caravan—she’s the only girl in the world who has never heard of The X Factor. When she accidentally stumbles into an audition with her talking dog, she starts a journey to both stardom and love. I Can’t Sing! goes beyond the microphone and under the judges’ desk to reveal the (not necessarily accurate) story of heartache and laughter that keeps millions tuning in every week.last_img read more

Leahy asks DOJ about president’s alleged war crimes pardons

first_img[11](link is external) Dan Lamothe & Josh Dawsey, “Insurgents” Lobbied Trump for War Crimes Pardons with Little Pentagon Involvement, Officials Say, NY Times (Nov. 21, 2019), available at https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/insurgents-lobbied-trump-for-war-crimes-pardons-with-little-pentagon-involvement-officials-say/2019/11/21/b6a0c62e-0c75-11ea-bd9d-c628fd48b3a0_story.html(link is external). [9](link is external) Gen. Krulak Statement on Trump’s Military Pardons, Human Rights First (Nov. 15, 2019), available at https://www.humanrightsfirst.org/press-release/gen-krulak-statement-trumps-military-pardons(link is external). [7](link is external) Philipps, supra note 1. [6](link is external) Gaouette, supra note 2. [3](link is external) Kyle Rempfer, Army Officer Convicted of Murder in Afghanistan to Get Another Look by Civilian Court, Army Times (July 1, 2019), available at https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2019/07/01/army-officer-convicted-of-murder-in-afghanistan-to-get-another-look-by-civilian-court/(link is external). [13](link is external) Dave Philipps, Trump May Be Preparing Pardons for Servicemen Accused of War Crimes, NY Times (May 18, 2019), available at https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/18/us/trump-pardons-war-crimes.html(link is external). [8](link is external) David S. Cloud, Senior Military Officers Rebel Against Trump Plan to Pardon Troops Accused of War Crimes, LA Times (May 22, 2019), available at https://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-pentagon-oppose-trump-pardon-murder-warcrimes-20190522-story.html(link is external). Vermont Business Magazine Senators Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont) and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) are asking the Department of Justice’s Office of Pardon Attorney what role it played in President Trump’s extraordinarily controversial decision to pardon US soldiers charged or convicted with serious war crimes. In light of U.S. military leaders’ vocal opposition to President Trump’s interventions in these cases, Leahy and Whitehouse are seeking answers about what advice the President received – and from whom – in making this decision to exercise his clemency powers.  The senators wrote:  “We write to determine what role your office played in President Trump’s recent decision to pardon military service members convicted or charged with war crimes.  While the President possesses broad pardon powers, these pardons were issued in the face of strong opposition from senior military officials, who warned that such pardons would undermine the U.S. military justice system and shake faith in our military’s commitment to abide by the laws of war.  Given your office’s institutional role and expertise for over 125 years in guiding presidents in the exercise of their pardon powers, we write to inquire whether, and to what extent, your office was involved in these matters.”The letter continues:  “The President’s pardon powers are virtually absolute.  That is precisely why safeguards must be in place to ensure that they are wielded judiciously – institutional safeguards like your office, which exists to ensure that the President’s pardon powers are exercised fairly and in the interests of justice.  Given our obligation to conduct oversight of the Justice Department, we request written answers to the following questions no later than December 13th.”A signed copy of the letter can be found here(link is external).  The full text of the letter is copied below.LETTERNovember 26, 2019Rosalind Sargent-BurnsActing Pardon AttorneyU.S. Department of JusticeOffice of the Pardon Attorney950 Pennsylvania Avenue, NWWashington, D.C. 20530Dear Ms. Sargent-Burns,We write to determine what role your office played in President Trump’s recent decision to pardon military service members convicted or charged with war crimes.[1](link is external) While the President possesses broad pardon powers, these pardons were issued in the face of strong opposition from senior military officials, who warned that such pardons would undermine the U.S. military justice system and shake faith in our military’s commitment to abide by the laws of war.[2](link is external) Given your office’s institutional role and expertise for over 125 years in guiding presidents in the exercise of their pardon powers, we write to inquire whether, and to what extent, your office was involved in these matters.President Trump intervened in the cases of three military service members either charged with or convicted of serious war crimes.  He pardoned and freed Army First Lt. Clint Lorance, who was serving a 19-year sentence for ordering his subordinates to fatally fire on unarmed civilians.[3](link is external) He pardoned and stopped the trial of Army Green Beret Maj. Matt Golsteyn, who confessed to and was charged with executing an unarmed detainee and immolating his corpse.[4](link is external)  And he restored the rank of Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who was charged with shooting unarmed civilians and killing a captured teenage combatant with a knife, and ultimately convicted of posing in a photograph with a dead captive.[5(link is external)]When President Trump’s plan to intervene in these cases was first reported in early November, the Department of Defense was so alarmed that Secretary of Defense Esper and other senior military officials reportedly orchestrated a lobbying effort to dissuade the President from doing so.[6](link is external) The Pentagon’s concerns about President Trump’s pardons have been echoed by many respected U.S. military figures.[7](link is external) Retired General Martin Dempsey, former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the “wholesale pardon of US service members accused of war crimes signals . . . that we don’t take the Law of Armed Conflict seriously,” and is an “abdication of moral responsibility.”[8](link is external) Retired General Charles Krulak, former Commandant of the Marine Corps, stated that these pardons could endanger our troops by “alienating populations whose support the United States needs…and providing a propaganda tool for extremists who wish to do us harm.”[9](link is external)  Most recently, in resigning his position as Secretary of the Navy over this issue, Richard Spencer wrote in a letter to the President that he “no longer share[s] the same understanding with the Commander in Chief . . . in regards to the key principle of good order and discipline,” and pointedly reminded the President that “The rule of law is what sets us apart from our adversaries.”[10](link is external) The U.S. military establishment’s vocal opposition to the President’s interventions in these cases raises serious questions about what advice President Trump received – and from whom – in deciding to exercise his clemency powers.  Reports indicate that President Trump’s views about these cases were shaped early on by a Fox News personality and advocates for the three soldiers.[11](link is external) Senior Pentagon officials, left out of White House discussions until recent weeks, believed the President was being provided misleading and even false information.[12](link is external)  The White House reportedly reached out to your office about these cases once in May, but it is unclear whether there was any further contact between your office and the White House, or whether your office ultimately provided your recommendations to the President.[13](link is external)The President’s pardon powers are virtually absolute. That is precisely why safeguards must be in place to ensure that they are wielded judiciously – institutional safeguards like your office, which exists to ensure that the President’s pardon powers are exercised fairly and in the interests of justice. Given our obligation to conduct oversight of the Justice Department, we request written answers to the following questions no later than December 13th:Did the White House reach out to your office on May 17, 2019, about the cases of Army First Lt. Clint Lorance, Army Green Beret Maj. Matt Golsteyn, and Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, as reporting indicates?[14]If so, was this the first time the White House reached out to your office about these three cases?If not, when was the first time the White House reached out to your office about these three cases, if at all?Did the White House ask for your recommendation about whether to issue pardons in these cases? Did the White House express the President’s intent to issue pardons in these cases, regardless of your input and recommendations, as reporting indicates?[15]Did your office provide recommendations to the White House about whether the President should exercise his pardon powers in these three cases?If so, what were your recommendations? Please describe your recommendations in each of the three cases, and the rationale for each recommendation. To the extent possible, please provide copies of documents memorializing your recommendations in each of the three cases.If so, when were those recommendations conveyed to the White House?If so, did your office either meet or attempt to meet with the President or anyone else in the White House to explain or discuss your recommendations with respect to the three cases?If your office did not provide recommendations in these three cases, why not?Was anyone outside your office at the Justice Department involved in providing advice and recommendations to the White House regarding these three cases? If so, who, and what role did they play? Were there any attempts to channel communications between your office and the White House on these matters through another division or office in the Justice Department? If so, why?To what extent was your office communicating and coordinating with the Department of Defense with respect to these three cases? Were you soliciting information or other input and recommendations from the Defense Department about these three cases? If so, what information and recommendations did you request and receive from the Defense Department?Section 9-140.110 of the Department of Justice’s Justice Manual states that your office “receives and reviews all petitions for Executive Clemency (which includes pardon after completion of sentence, commutation of sentence, remission of fine or restitution and reprieve), initiates and directs the necessary investigations, and prepares a report and recommendation for submission to the President in every case.”Was there a petition for Executive Clemency submitted to your office or the Justice Department in any of these three cases?Has the Office of the Pardon Attorney ever recommended a presidential pardon or commutation for a military service member convicted of war crimes? If so, please provide details about those cases and why the Office of the Pardon Attorney recommended a pardon or commutation.Has the Office of the Pardon Attorney ever recommended a presidential pardon when an individual has not yet been convicted and has charges pending? If so, please provide details about those cases and why the Office of the Pardon Attorney recommended a pardon.How many of the pardons or commutations issued by President Trump during his term thus far involved a petition for Executive Clemency to your office and followed the process described in Section 9-140.110?Sincerely,___________________________                                            ___________________________Patrick Leahy                                                                           Sheldon WhitehouseUnited States Senator                                                               United States Senator[1](link is external) Dave Philipps, Trump’s Pardons for Servicemen Raise Fears That Laws of War Are History, NY Times (Nov. 16, 2019), available at https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/16/us/trump-pardon-military.html(link is external).center_img [5](link is external) Dave Philipps, Navy SEAL Chief Accused of War Crimes Is Found Not Guilty of Murder, NY Times (July 2, 2019), available at https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/02/us/navy-seal-trial-verdict.html(link is external). [2](link is external) Nicole Gaouette et al., Trump Ignores Pentagon Advice and Intervenes in Military War Crimes Cases, CNN (Nov. 18, 2019), available at https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/15/politics/trump-war-crimes-intervenes/index.html(link is external). [10](link is external) Navy Secretary Richard Spencer’s Letter to the President Acknowledging His Termination, CNN (Nov. 24, 2019), available at https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/24/politics/read-navy-secretary-richard-spencer-resignation-letter/index.html(link is external). [12](link is external) Id. [4](link is external) Leo Shane III et al., Trump Grants Clemency to Troops in Three Controversial War Crimes Cases, Military Times (Nov. 16, 2019), available at https://www.militarytimes.com/news/pentagon-congress/2019/11/16/trump-grants-clemency-to-troops-in-three-controversial-war-crimes-cases/(link is external). [14](link is external) Philipps, supra note 12.[15](link is external) Id.Source: (TUESDAY, Nov. 26, 2019) – Senator Patrick Leahylast_img read more

Triathlonguard Long Course Weekend on air

first_img Related The Triathlonguard Long Course Weekend is on Channel 4 this Sunday 25 September at 05:45 and on Channel +1 at 06:45.The Pembrokeshire Coastal National Park in South West Wales hosts this swim, bike, run event which is made up of three races in three days – the Wales Swim, the Wales Sportive and the Wales Marathon. With each discipline taking place as a separate stage, by the time competitors finish the marathon in the historic coastal resort of Tenby they will have completed an iron-distance triathlon.Presented by Aly Vance the Channel 4 show will highlight the thousands taking part, the strong crowd support and plenty of individual competition in each stage, as well as the ultimate prize of being fastest across all three events.Produced by Dream Team Television, a number of events are also coming up on Channel 4, and will be airing via the TV station in the next couple of months:IRONMAN Wales – 1 OctoberEuropean City of Sport Triathlon, Stoke on Trent – 8 OctoberPlusnet Yorkshire Marathon – 15 OctoberManchester Half Marathon – 29 OctoberSnowdonia Triathlon Festival – 19 NovemberSandman Triathlon – 26 NovemberHaving established a close partnership with Channel 4 television, Dream Team Television is one of the UK’s leading production companies specialising in multisport, adventure, athletics and motorsport programming. The company has an international reputation for producing some of the highest quality programmes in these specialist areas.www.dreamteamtv.co.ukwww.channel4.comwww.longcourseweekend.comlast_img read more

Fr. Glenn: Intentional Mediocrity

first_imgBy Fr. Glenn Jones“If the minimum wasn’t good enough, it wouldn’t be the minimum.”I vividly remember that statement from an acquaintance years ago … and not fondly. He was quite happy to perform the very least required of him and, as you can imagine, eventually the minimum wasn’t good enough and, while still in the same profession, his peers have risen in the ranks around him while he remains mired at the lowest level.The result? Complaints of being treated unfairly; after all, hasn’t he been working there much longer than the others? “Don’t I do what is [minimally] required?” One can’t help but wonder:  “Well … what did he expect?”, and it reminds of the scripture: “The soul of the sluggard craves, and gets nothing, while the soul of the diligent is richly supplied.” (Proverbs 13:4)  Undependable … unreliable … his effort spent in seeking every opportunity and excuse to avoid productive labor. Last to work, first to leave, etc.We’ve all probably known such; every office and worksite has them (you’re thinking about some right now, I’d bet!)—those who refuse to go the extra mile—or even the extra inch—for the good of the family, group, organization or goal. In fact, sometimes those who work with them have to drag them to the finish! (think of Wally in the comic strip “Dilbert”… but less witty).  Many times employers simply endure it because it’s more bother than it’s worth to find someone else—especially in our current litigious society. “If they fire me, I’ll sue!” is a laggard’s threat, so the employer makes the inevitable cost analysis: time and $$$ vs. is it worth the trouble. And so, the employer often just tolerates, even though “Like vinegar to the teeth, and smoke to the eyes, so is the sluggard …” (Proverbs 10:26) Not exactly a positive tribute for anyone.Oh, and let’s not forget in families. How often we priests and ministers witness people caring and spending for elderly/sickly relatives, while other family members and ostensible long-time friends—even if locally present and able—hardly lift a finger. One hates to be harsh, but if the neglectors are the neglected’s children, the term “ingrate” comes to mind, I’m afraid … especially remembering “With all your heart honor your father, and do not forget the birth pangs of your mother. Remember that through your parents you were born; and what can you give back to them that equals their gift to you?” (Sirach 7:27-28) Conversely, dutiful attentiveness will no doubt redound to the diligent caregivers’ eternal glory, while the neglectful … not so much. The latter in St. Paul’s time merited one of his most severe admonitions: “If any one does not provide for his relatives, and especially for his own family, he has disowned the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.” (1 Timothy 5:8)Prison ministers often comment about the ingenuity and industriousness of criminals in committing crimes, and how the same energies applied to legal and productive pursuits would have resulted in an incomparably more honorable result, not to mention continued freedom. Similarly, there is no hiding a dawdling spirit and work ethic, and the slacker’s reputation will always be one peppered with disdain. How much more honorable, then, is diligence in one’s work, occupation, or vocation … to be known as one upon which others can rely, to always seek to put out 110%, to be the go-to person in time of need. The virtuous should be content with humble service and not seek honors, but honor comes nonetheless to the dependable, the reliable, the self-motivated. That principle touches on the contrast between two of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount admonitions which, on the surface, might seem to contradict, but the key lay in intent: “…when you give alms, sound no trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be praised by men.” (Matthew 6:2) compared to “Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.” (Matthew 5:16)The sincere Christian knows this … not only because of Jesus’ own words (which should be quite sufficient!), but later also through the teaching of St. Paul: “Let no one seek his own good, but the good of his neighbor.” (1 Corinthians 10:24) and “Whatever your task, work heartily, as serving the Lord and not men…” (Colossians 3:23) Thus, since fruitful labor helps to build up society and the kingdom of God, sincere service leads toward the final end—the goal—of the Good. This ought be reward enough to the Christian who remembers his fealty to God and the plethora of gifts already received and promised—not seeking his own temporal glory, but remembering Jesus: “…when you have done all that is commanded you, say, ‘We are unworthy servants; we have only done what was our duty.’” (Luke 17:10)I pray that young people especially take note for, in an era in which so much is simply given with little effort required, and young people are often protected from anything that might possibly upset them (“safe spaces”), a distressing sense of entitlement has wormed its way into many a psyche—so much so as to become the object of comedy and ridicule, and bane of both employers and families. Stepping back to take in the larger view, Jesus’ wisdom rings ever more true: “… let the greatest among you become as the youngest, and the leader as one who serves” (Luke 22:26) … because entitlement takes, while service gives, and “It is more blessed to give than to receive.” (Act 20:35) “I passed by the field of a sluggard, by the vineyard of a man without sense;and lo, it was all overgrown with thorns; the ground was covered with nettles, and its stone wall was broken down.Then I saw and considered it; I looked and received instruction.A little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to rest,and poverty will come upon you like a robber, and want like an armed man. (Proverbs 24:30-34)Rev. Glenn Jones is the Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe and former pastor of Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Los Alamos.last_img read more

Mick Jordan Joins SA Gear

first_imgWith more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  Prior to joining SA Gear, Jordan servedas chairman of the Overseas Automotive Council (OAC) from 2015-2016.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement “We’re really excited to have Mr. Jordan on our side,’ said Magdee Abdallah, CFO of SA Gear. “When the opportunity came, we couldn’t wait to bring him on the team to help expand our brand.” DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement SA Gear, Inc., located in Bedford Park, Illinois, announces that industry veteran Mick Jordan has joined the company.  Jordan, who spent 36 years with AASA member company Cloyes Gear & Products, Inc. in various executive roles, will assume the position of VP of international sales. SA Gear is a leading aftermarket manufacturer of automotive engine timing drive systems.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

Conroe Welding Supply joins Linde network

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Chart reshuffles Sales Management

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

Stop navel-gazing and look up

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

Monster lift on debut

first_imgThe new floating sheerleg, which can be seen at the Keppel Fels shipyard in Singapore with her sister vessel, the 3,200-tonne capacity Asian Hercules II.The pair worked together to lift the 4,850-tonne top deck for the newly built Floatel Triumph from the Korea Express ship, Korex SPB No 1, with the Asian Hercules III taking 3,500 tonnes of the load, whilst Asian Hercules II took 1,350 tonnes. Photo courtesy of Piet Sinke @ www.maasmondmaritime.com www.asianlift.com.sglast_img

QS founder launches ‘Trip Advisor’-style legal comparison site

first_imgOne of the founders of the QualitySolicitors network will today set live a comparison website which he is hailing as a ‘Trip Advisor’ equivalent for solicitors.Clients will be able to give a rating of their firm on a range of factors through the ReviewSolicitors site, with the results displayed based on the average score of each.Law firms can register to include a link to the site in every email sent to their clients, encouraging them to rate service levels. Lawyers will be encouraged to respond personally to comments and advised on how best to do so.The site will include a ‘premium level’ service for law firms, starting at £250 a month, which will give them top placing in search results, let them appear on the page of rival firms and provide social media support for marketing services.The site has been created and part-funded by chief executive Saleem Arif (pictured), a marketing specialist who jointly founded QS in 2008 with Craig Holt. Arif left the network last year having helped to sell 51% of the company to private equity investor Palamon Capital Partners.Arif said ReviewSolicitors, which will go live after the Legalex conference today, aims to get 1,000 firms signed up for the premium service and to change the way lawyers regard feedback or criticism.‘This is something the market has been crying out for,’ he said. ‘It is disruptive and will make a massive difference to great firms that provide an excellent service – those firms have nothing to worry about.‘There is a certain amount of hesitation because of a lack of control, and at the moment many firms publish their own testimonials, but the world has moved on. This is not about criticising solicitors but getting them to be as good as they can.’Arif said his venture would set itself apart from other legal comparison websites through focusing on service levels rather than price.This would help to ‘level the playing field’ for smaller firms, he suggested, who cannot compete on price with firms doing work in bulk. The information on firms has been collected over several months by an outsourcing specialist in India.Ratings will be monitored either for self-promotion by individuals or attempts to sabotage the profile of a rival. The ratings will be weighted towards more recent feedback, with scores dating back several years taking on reduced importance.Arif is joined in the management team by director Pete Storey, a former colleague at technology corporation IBM, who went on to found a comparison site for insurance firms in Australia. Michael Hanney, former head of business development at QS, is also a director.last_img read more