ONE: Late replacement Donayre braces for fight of his life vs Khan

first_img“That’s the only advantage he has. His preparation and his team. He’s with a good team ever since. But I think I’ve got edge on the ground—an advantage. And he hasn’t been tested,” he said. “Like what I’ve told everyone, this is gonna be his test and this is gonna be my stand. Three losses and no wins? Come on, man. I gotta do something. So this is is my stand and his test.”“I think [my biggest advantage is] gonna be on the grappling. I’m gonna exploit that. I’m gonna exploit his jiu jitsu game,” said Donayre, a purple belt in Brazilian jiu jitsu. “I know he’s gonna throw a lot of kicks, which is good for me, because if you throw one, one leg’s on the floor and I’m gonna go for that.”Donayre has dropped five of his last six fights and at this stage of his career, he can’t afford another setback.He considers his bout with Khan as his final stand if he winds up on the losing end anew.That, though, remains a big if. After hearing his opponent predicting a first round victory, Donayre found more reasons to go all out.ADVERTISEMENT Filipino fighter Vaughn Donayre, right, stands eye-to-eye with Singaporean Amir Khan during the ONE: Defending Honor: Official Face-off at Clark Quay in Singapore. Photo from ONE Championship’s Facebook accountDespite having limited time to prepare, Filipino bet Vaughn Donayre is confident he will emerge victorious against hometown fighter Amir Khan.Donayre was added into the ONE: Defending Honor as a late replacement for the injured Samir Mrabet.ADVERTISEMENT Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Ravena makes it to Texas Legends as ‘developmental player’ EDITORS’ PICK Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 View comments 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol towncenter_img As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise We are young Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine “He already talked s**t saying he’s gonna knock me in the first round. A former world champion couldn’t do that to me. I almost knocked him out twice!” said Donayre, referring to his countryman Honorio Banario whom he lost to by unanimous decision last April. “He (Khan) is not gonna do that to me. If he’s not gonna do that, I’ll do that to him.”“He walks like a gangster. He’s gonna be in for a rude awakening. For me, this is just not about winning. Like I said this is my stand. This is gonna be the fight of my life.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ PH among economies most vulnerable to virus The 37-year-old Donayre, a Cebuano who is based in Dubai, was only called up a week ago but had no second thoughts in seizing the opportunity.“I was actually ready for combat, but not just MMA. So when I got the call, I was on weight, and I was already training—specific, jiu jitsu. So when I talked to my coaches, they said, “You ready?” and we went for it,” Donayre said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentDonayre said the only edge Khan has over him is that he will come into the fight more prepared.Other than that, Donayre stressed he’s the better fighter especially when the bout is taken to the ground. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

On an island in the sun, coal power is king over abundant solar

first_imgBanner image: Balinese fishermen from Celukan Bawang village stage a protest against the coal plant for pollution and job loss. Image courtesy of Greenpeace. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Activism, Air Pollution, Animals, Carbon Emissions, Clean Energy, Coal, Conflict, Dolphins, Energy, Environment, Environmental Activism, Fossil Fuels, Health, Land Conflict, Marine Animals, Marine Mammals, Mercury, Pollution, Public Health, Renewable Energy, Social Conflict, Solar Power, Waste, Water Pollution Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Locals and environmentalists have opposed a plan to expand a coal-fired power plan in northern Bali, Indonesia.They are worried that the expansion will exacerbate the existing impact of the plant on the environment and locals’ health and livelihoods.A particular concern focuses on the survival of dolphins and endemic species living in close proximity to the plant, with Greenpeace saying the dolphins have particularly been affected since the plant came on line in 2015.Another major worry is air pollution, with many locals complaining of respiratory ailments as a result of the fumes and coal dust emitted from the plant. JAKARTA — Dolphins haven’t had it easy in Bali, a resort island in Indonesia that’s massively popular with tourists.They’re often held captive in chlorinated pools for traveling circuses; a report alleges that dolphins at one such outfit had their teeth filed down or removed altogether to prevent bite injuries to swimmers.But the biggest challenge they face is one that threatens their habitat and that could potentially drive them away from the island’s waters. That challenge comes in the form of a massive coal-fired power plant in the sleepy fishing village of Celukan Bawang, on Bali’s north coast. The plant lies west of the popular Lovina Beach, a prime spot for dolphin-watching boat tours.But the tour operators could soon be out of business, if the grim scenario painted by a Greenpeace report plays out. Since the plant began operating in 2015, the environmental watchdog says, it has dumped coal waste residue on the land and in the sea, wreaking havoc on the local ecosystem. The steady traffic of coal barges supplying the plant have also damaged coral reefs and driven away fish.The impact has been far-reaching, the report says, with local fishermen forced to sail further out to sea because of declining catches in their traditional fishing areas closer to shore.Dolphins putting on a bit of a show for tourists (in exchange for a bucket of fish) off the island of Bali, Indonesia. Image by Dominic Alves/Flickr.In hot waterDidit Haryo, a climate and energy campaigner at Greenpeace Indonesia, says dolphins are among the animals most affected by the power plant.The plant is just 20 kilometers (12 miles) from Lovina Beach, and as such lies easily within the typical dolphin roaming range of around 40 kilometers.“In the past, locals in Celukan Bawang said there were still many dolphins passing by,” Didit told Mongabay. “But they say they rarely see dolphins nowadays.”There are several ways in which the plant is potentially impacting the local dolphin population, says Putu Liza Kusuma Mustika, a marine mammal expert at the University of Queensland in Australia.For starters, there’s the pollution from the heavy metals disposed of into the sea, as well as rising water temperatures due to the pumping of hot water from the plant’s cooling system. Then there’s the high volume of coal-barge traffic, raising the risk of dolphins getting hit. Finally there’s the noise pollution from the ships’ sonar, which can disorient the dolphins, who rely on their own sonar to communicate and navigate.“But the biggest threats are the heavy metal pollution and hot water,” Liza told Mongabay.Liza, who studied the dolphins of northern Bali in 2010, said she found they ranged from 10 kilometers (6 miles) east of Celukan Bawang, to 40 kilometers west of the village, in West Bali National Park. That puts the power plant right in the dolphins’ known habitat.Didit said he suspected the decrease in reported dolphin sightings off Celukan Bawang was liked directly to the warming of the seawater there, which is pumped into the plant to cool it before being pumped back out at a higher temperature.“It’s still an assumption, but it must’ve been caused by the power plant, which needs a lot of water to cool down its machines,” he said.Liza said that while there had been no research done on the direct impact to dolphins of warmer waters around power plants, climate research had shown that a water temperature increase of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) was devastating for whales. Dolphins and whales in tropical waters can only tolerate temperatures up to 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit).“Anything more than 30 degrees Celsius will likely cause them to flee,” Liza said. “But unfortunately, this fact is used by the proponents of the power plant to argue that it’s actually a good thing for the dolphins to flee from the plant.”The environmental agency in Buleleng district, the administrative region that includes Lovina, Celukan Bawang and the West Bali National Park, said that its own tests showed water and air quality near the power plant were at acceptable levels. According to the agency, six samples of seawater from the area showed an average temperature of 30.9 degrees Celsius (87.6 degrees Fahrenheit) — lower than the officially sanctioned limit of 35 degrees Celsius (85 degrees Fahrenheit), but higher than the tolerable limit for cetaceans.These include beaked whales, whose migration route passes through the area, according to Liza. She said four of the whales got stranded on the shore between Celukan Bawang and Lovina in August 2015, the same month the power plant went into operation.Lovina Beach, one of the most famous beach resorts in North Bali, Indonesia. The beach resort is threatened by the expansion of a coal power plant nearby. Image by marthelelièvre/flickr.Impact on the communityIt’s not just the marine life that’s feeling the literal and figurative heat from the Celukan Bawang plant. Locals have complained about pollution, waste, loss of livelihoods, and unresolved land compensation deals, with a third of the plant’s site still in dispute.The impact on the local community was documented in a Greenpeace report released in April this year, which quoted residents and local officials. Many of them complained of health problems, particularly respiratory ailments caused by the dust and fumes from the burning coal.One of them is Karimun, 63, who lives just 50 meters (164 feet) from where the plant’s smoke stacks stand today, with nine other family members. This is despite a 1997 law on environmental impact assessments, which stipulates a minimum distance of 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) between a power plant and the nearest residential area.“I’m worried about my health,” Karimun said as quoted in the report. “I’ve gotten sick, so have my grandchildren, usually from respiratory issues and fevers.”Before the plant was built, Karimun said, none of them had been this sick. But now, she said, they visited the doctor at least four times a month.Emissions from coal-fired power plants can expose people living within the vicinity to dangerous levels of tiny carcinogenic particles known as PM2.5. These particles are small enough to enter the bloodstream, and long-term exposure to them can cause acute respiratory infections and cardiovascular disease. Other noxious emissions produced by coal-fired power plants include nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, and heavy metals like mercury.Since the government doesn’t provide air quality data in the area, Greenpeace decided to monitor the air quality in Celukan Bawang and the main tourism hub of Denpasar, some 100 kilometers (62 miles) southeast of the plant.According to Greenpeace’s real-time monitoring, uploaded to the global air quality monitoring platform IQAIR Air Visual, the level of PM2.5 in Celukan Bawang usually hit more than 50 micrograms per cubic meter in the mornings. This is double the WHO’s guideline level of 25 micrograms per cubic meter in a 24-hour period. On July 3, the PM2.5 level in Celukan Bawang spiked to 100.4 micrograms per cubic meter.Greenpeace’s Didit said PM2.5 particles could travel as far as Denpasar on the wind. The watchdog’s air quality data showed two days during the monitoring period — July 19 and 24 — when the PM2.5 level in the city exceeded the WHO guideline level, hitting 29.8 and 29.6 micrograms per cubic meter, respectively.PT General Energy Bali, which operates the power plant, has refuted Greenpeace’s claims. It said that since the plant began operating three years ago, it had not caused any damage to the environment. The company’s general affairs manager, Putu Singyen, said the operator had adhered to every government regulation, including those related to the environment.“I’m also a Buleleng resident and I don’t want the environment to be damaged,” he told The Jakarta Post. “Everything is fine.”This image from Google Earth shows Celukan Bawang village and the coal plant on its coast.Doubling downThe operator is now looking to more than double the plant’s output to meet growing demand for electricity across Bali. The Celukan Bawang plant currently has a generating capacity of 426 megawatts; the second phase of the project would bring an additional 660 megawatts on line.Environmental activists say they’re concerned that this will result in increases in pollution, pumping of hot water into the sea, and barge traffic.Mercury and ash produced from burning the coal could wash as far as Lovina Beach, destroying the dolphins’ habitat, said Greenpeace senior coal campaigner and air pollution researcher Lauri Myllyvirta. The group calculates that the amount of mercury produced annually by the power plant should the expansion go ahead would more than double from the current 30 kilograms to 80 kilograms (66 pounds to 176 pounds).Liza said this could spell greater trouble for the dolphins.“The pollutants will accumulate in their bodies,” she said. And because they’re mammals, they could potentially pass it on to their offspring through their milk, she said.The expansion of the plant could also exacerbate the air pollution, eventually enveloping the entire island and threatening the tourism industry, the backbone of Bali’s economy, Myllyvirta said.An infographic showing the potential impact of the expansion of the Celukan Bawang Power Plant in North Bali, Indonesia. Image by Greenpeace.According to Greenpeace’s modeling, the air pollution could also affect West Bali National Park, home to several endemic species, including the critically endangered Bali myna (Leucopsar rothschildi).“Why is the impact of the expanded power plant expected to be much greater than the existing impact?” Didit said. “It’s simply because the planned capacity of the plant … It means more coal and more pollution.”Greenpeace says the current level of air pollution from the plant is responsible for causing 190 premature deaths each year, and says the figure could total to 7,000 after 30 years in operation at its current capacity.If the plant is expanded, the projected number of deaths over that same period could top 19,000, Greenpeace says.The Celukan Bawang coal-fired power plant has been blamed by advocacy group Greenpeace for damaging the environment, public health and the local economy. Image by Alit Kertaraharja/Mongabay-Indonesia.‘Hothouse Earth’Those same emissions will also have significant climate impacts. The expanded plant is projected to burn nearly 3 million tonnes of coal per year, according to the environmental impact assessment for the project. After 30 years, it would have released more than 200 million tonnes of carbon dioxide, the equivalent of the exhaust emissions of 38.8 million motor vehicles over the course of a year.That would exacerbate the threat that climate change already poses to the hundreds of thousands of people living along Bali’s northern coast, according to Sarah Burt, a staff attorney at the U.S.-based nonprofit Earthjustice.“Although this region is already imperiled by warming seas, sea level rise and storm surges, the government ignored climate change when approving the project,” she said in a blog post.It will also jeopardize Indonesia’s international commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 29 percent by 2030. And the stakes have never been this high for Indonesia, and other countries, to meet, if not exceed, their climate targets, with researchers warning that the planet could soon cross a threshold leading to extreme weather events and rising sea levels.Even if countries succeed in meeting their emission reduction targets, the world could still lurch toward this “irreversible pathway” into a future scenario dubbed “hothouse Earth,” according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“What we are saying is that when we reach 2 degrees of warming, we may be at a point where we hand over the control mechanism to Planet Earth herself,” Johan Rockström of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, a co-author of the study, told BBC News.Under this scenario, some of the Earth’s natural sinks of carbon dioxide, such as forests, oceans and soil, will become net emitters, leading to a cycle of uncontrollable warming.“We are the ones in control right now, but once we go past 2 degrees, we see that the Earth system tips over from being a friend to a foe,” Rockström said. “We totally hand over our fate to an Earth system that starts rolling out of equilibrium.”The first trial of the lawsuit filed by locals of the Celukan Bawang village in North Bali, Indonesia, against the Bali provincial administration for issuing the permit for the expansion of the Celukan Bawang Power Plant, on March 6, 2018. Image by Anton Muhajir/Mongabay Indonesia.‘Null and void’In a bid to stop the expansion of the plant, community leaders in Celukan Bawang, supported by Greenpeace and lawyers from the Bali chapter of the Indonesian Legal Aid Foundation (YLBHI), have filed a lawsuit against the Bali provincial administration. They argue that the permit for the plant’s expansion was issued by the governor of Bali in April 2017 without the prior and involved consent of the affected communities.In his court, Muhamad Anshari, a resident, said the meeting to inform locals about the plant expansion project in August 2016 was only attended by 23 people from two neighborhood units — less than 1 percent of Celukan Bawang’s population of 5,461 people from 23 neighborhood units.The residents also note that the permit fails to include detailed assessments on the impact of the expansion on the environment, the health of residents, and their livelihoods. The permit, for instance, omits projections on the plant expansion’s impact on air quality, as well as data on the existing impact of the plant on air quality.“I’ve experienced firsthand the impact of the existing plant,” said Ketut Mangku Wiana, one of the plaintiffs. “There’s a stench coming from the plant. My throat became very dry.”Liza, the marine biologist who testified as an expert witness in the trial, said the environmental impact assessment for the plant expansion was riddled with omissions, including simple points such as the date that water samples were collected.“I read the document and I couldn’t find the date,” she said. “I’m not an expert in environmental impact assessments, but if the document was a thesis, I wouldn’t give it a passing grade because, scientifically speaking, it has a lot of holes.”She also countered skepticism raised about her expertise, saying that while her study on dolphins near Celukan Bawang was conducted in 2010, long before the plant was built, it was still more than the plant operators had done.“Did they even bother to study [the impact of the plant on dolphins] at all?” she said. “They have to prove [that the plant doesn’t affect the dolphins] through modeling, but there’s no research at all.”In support of the lawsuit, Earthjustice, along with the Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL) and other green NGOS from around the world have submitted an amicus brief to aid the court in its decision. The groups say the expansion plan for the Celukan Bawang plant doesn’t include a comprehensive analysis of the climate change impacts.Margaretha Quina, the head of environmental pollution at ICEL, said that reason alone should be enough for the court “to declare the Celukan Bawang power plant’s environmental permit null and void.”The brief also says the project is vulnerable to the effects of climate change, including sea level rise and warming waters.“Sea level rise as high as 1.32 meters [4.33 feet] would increase the risk of coastal flooding and storm surges, which would affect operation of the plant, including threats to coal ash containment structures,” the groups said.A coal pit at the Celukan Bawang power plant in northern Bali. Image by Alit Kertaraharja/Mongabay Indonesia.King coalThe expansion of the Celukan Bawang plant is representative of the Indonesian government’s heavy reliance on coal to meet the country’s growing energy needs.More than 60 percent of the electricity produced in Indonesia comes from coal-fired plants, and that capacity is expected to nearly double by 2027 to meet rising demand, according to the government’s electricity procurement business plan.Bali, in particular, is experiencing a tourism boom, with new hotels and restaurants popping up regularly. That demand will have to be met by building new power-generating capacity on the island, either through coal or gas, Jisman Hutajulu, a senior electricity official at the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, told Reuters.However, Jisman said the decision on whether to opt for more fossil fuel capacity or renewable energy was ultimately up to local governments to make, with energy security, the environment and the cost all factored in.Critics of the Celukan Bawang plant say the additional power demand can easily be met with renewable energy, given sunny Bali’s untapped potential for solar generation.A worker walking by rows of solar panels at the Kayubihi Power Plant in Bangli district, Bali. The Kayubihi Power Plant is the only solar-powered plant operating in Bali out of a total of three plants. Image by Anton Muhajir/Mongabay Indonesia.Island in the sunIf Bali’s renewable energy potential was fully exploited, it could generate as much as 115,372 gigawatt-hours per year of electricity, 98 percent of it from solar — far above its projected requirement of just 4,992.7 GWh per year by 2019 — according to a 2017 report by the Asian Development Bank (ADB).Even if just 5 percent of that renewable potential was developed, the island could easily meet its projected energy requirement.The districts of Buleleng in the north, home to Celukan Bawang, and Klungkung in the southeast offer the greatest technical potential for solar development, according to the ADB report. Combined, these two regions, where thousands of people still lack reliable access to electricity, could generate 59,000 gigawatt-hours per year of power from solar alone, the ADB researchers estimated.In Denpasar, the provincial capital, there’s “huge potential” to install solar panels on rooftops, the report said, pointing to warehouses, factories, schools, public buildings and other structures with concrete roofs.Annual solar irradiance, or the total power per unit received from the sun, ranges from 1,490 to 1,776 kilowatt-hours per square meter in Bali, compared to 900 kilowatt-hours per square meter in parts of Europe, where that figure is considered sufficient for solar power generation.“[This] is a clear indication that Bali has the potential for commercially viable solar energy projects,” the ADB report said. “However, without proper policy and market intervention, it would be difficult to harness this potential.”The researchers also said that large energy storage systems would be needed if all the power demand in Bali was to be met by solar energy.Another hurdle to renewables in Indonesia is legislation stipulating that new renewable energy projects must provide electricity at a price about 15 percent cheaper than existing power plants in a given province. As a result, renewables often cannot compete with dirt-cheap coal.Despite all the challenges, Greenpeace’s Didit said the ADB report clearly showed it was up to the government to tap into the renewables potential with appropriate policies and market intervention.Bali already has three solar power plants. But only one of them, in Bangli district, is operating and selling power to state-owned electricity company PLN, after the local administration established a local company to sign an agreement with PLN. The two other plants are largely abandoned, with decaying facilities and no one to operate them.“Because the local governments have no willingness [to support them],” Didit said. “So the problem only lies in the willingness of the government. If they want [to develop renewables], they certainly can, because the price of solar panels in the past 10 years has declined by more than 60 percent.”Businesses also prefer renewables over coal to meet energy demand on the island, saying that the pollution from coal-fired plants could jeopardize the resort island’s tourism industry.“Clean energy and sustainability are among requirements for quality tourism,” Bagus Sudibya, vice president of the Association of Indonesia Tours and Travel (ASITA), told The Jakarta Post. “Coal, one of the non-renewable energy sources, has been avoided by developed countries. Why are we still using it?”Bali’s current power supply is already more than sufficient to meet demand, rendering the planned expansion of the Celukan Bawang plant redundant, critics say. Bali’s energy demand peaked in October 2016, reaching 860 megawatts, according to PLN’s electricity procurement business plan. Supply, meanwhile, is at 1,200 megawatts, about a third of which comes from neighboring Java Island, through undersea cables, Didit said.“So based on data from recent years, Bali won’t need that much energy as the existing energy supply is enough,” he said. “So this is the perfect time for Bali to shift from dirty fossil fuels to clean energy.”last_img read more

A ‘monoculture of jellyfish’ threatens the oceans as we know them (insider)

first_imgJeremy Hance writes about how jellyfish could come to dominate the world’s oceansOverfishing has removed fish from marine ecosystems at astounding rates, which has opened the door for jellyfish to take their place.Eutrophication is another human-caused change in the ocean that has likely contributed to jellyfish explosions.This is an insider story. To read, please become a member. It could be a plot of a (bad) science-fiction film: a man-made disaster creates spawns of millions upon millions of jellyfish that rapidly take over the ocean. Humans, starving for mahi-mahi and Chilean seabass, turn to jellyfish, which becomes the new tuna (after the tuna fishery has collapsed, of course). Fish sticks become jelly sticks,… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists. Article published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Fishing, Insider, Jellyfish, Oceans, Wildlife last_img read more

Local fishers oppose $2.7 billion deal opening Madagascar to Chinese fishing

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Two months ago, a little-known private Malagasy association signed a 10-year, $2.7 billion fishing deal — the largest in the country’s history — with a group of Chinese companies that plans to send 330 fishing vessels to Madagascar.Critics of the deal include the country’s fisheries minister, who said he learned about it in the newspaper; environmental and government watchdog groups; and local fishers, who are already struggling with foreign competition for Madagascar’s dwindling marine stocks.Critics say no draft of the deal has been made public and the association that signed it did not conduct an environmental impact assessment or any public consultation.The issue has drawn media attention in the run-up to the presidential election on Wednesday. The incumbent and a leading candidate, Hery Rajaonarimampianina, was present at the fisheries deal’s signing, although he later claimed not to be familiar with it. Life on the coast of Madagascar is increasingly precarious. In recent decades, the overexploitation of marine life has made it difficult for hundreds of thousands of small-scale fishers to make a living. So it’s no surprise that they are vocally opposing a new agreement to bring hundreds of additional Chinese vessels into their waters.Two months ago, a little-known and ostensibly private Malagasy association signed a 10-year, $2.7 billion fishing deal — the largest in the country’s history — with a group of Chinese companies that plans to send 330 fishing vessels to Madagascar. Madagascar’s president at the time, Hery Rajaonarimampianina, was in the room when the deal was signed in Beijing on Sept. 5, although he later claimed not to be familiar with it. No draft of the deal has been made public, and its opacity has drawn media attention in the run-up to the presidential election on Wednesday. Rajaonarimampianina stepped down as president on Sept. 7, two days after the deal was signed, to comply with Malagasy law that requires a sitting president to leave office 60 days before an election in which he is running. He is a leading candidate in the election.On the Madagascar side, the Agence Malagasy de Développement économique et de Promotion d’entreprises (AMDP) made the deal, which the group says was designed to promote the country’s “blue economy.” It did so without consulting the fisheries ministry, the national environment office, or civil society groups, many of which are now calling for the deal to be scrapped. These critics say the AMDP failed to set up an open bidding process and did not conduct an environmental impact assessment or any public consultation. They also note that there’s limited information on fishing efforts and catches in Madagascar’s waters, so any new projects should be taken on with extreme caution.“I can’t help but wonder how 330 vessels in our coastal zone would contribute to a blue economy. Not everything that happens in the ocean is ‘blue,’” Nanie Ratsifandrihamanana, country director for the international NGO World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), wrote in an op-ed in one of Madagascar’s leading newspapers.Activists have started an online petition to revoke the agreement, and some members of the government are equally concerned. Augustin Andriamananoro, the minister of fisheries, went on national television to voice his opposition to the deal, which he said he first read about in a newspaper.“This could bring about discord and, if we are not careful, it will cause our ocean to be overexploited,” he told TV Plus Madagascar on Oct. 5. “Madagascar’s natural resources are in danger, especially the fish. The fishers are shocked and concerned.”A cartoon that ran on the Malagasy news site 2424.mg. The caption reads “Blue Economy = 10-year fishing deal with China.” Image courtesy of 2424.mg.A deal without detailsThe AMDP signed what it describes as a “framework agreement” with a consortium of seven unidentified Chinese companies known as Taihe Century (Beijing) Investment Development Co., Ltd. The AMDP has said in public statements that the agreement will be a boon to the local economy, and said in a press release from Beijing when the deal was signed that it would create 10,000 jobs over the next three years.“As a civil society actor, we heard the needs of traditional fishers,” Hugues Ratsiferana, the AMDP’s CEO, wrote in an email to Mongabay. He said that Malagasy people would operate 300 of the fishing vessels, and that these would all be new, 14-meter (46-foot) vessels with 1,200-kilogram-capacity (2,646-pound) iceboxes. The new equipment will allow Malagasy fishers to modernize and professionalize their fishing practices, he said. The remaining 30 vessels will be 28 meters (92 feet) in length and used for surveillance, rescue and collection of catch.Though there has been a slow trickle of information regarding the deal, the lack of transparency has concerned observers. “The scale of this investment is unprecedented in the island’s history,” reads an Oct. 12 statement on the website of Mihari, a network of locally managed marine associations in Madagascar. “It is a great source of concern for our Network members and the entire fishing industry, especially as we have little information about the content of the agreement or the manner in which it will be implemented.”Last week, AMDP representatives met with civil society groups and explained a bit more about the agreement. The first phase of the project, worth $700 million over three years, will include investments in fishing, aquaculture, shipyards and technical training, according to slides from the AMDP’s presentation. The second phase, worth $2 billion, will include more fishing, an aquaculture “base” and unspecified logistical services.The AMDP representatives did not specify where the vessels would be based, the fishing would be done, or the projects would take place — not even for a planned pilot project. Nor did they present a complete breakdown of how the $2.7 billion would be spent.In an apparent attempt to mollify critics, AMDP representatives said at the meeting that Malagasy people would have first access to the catch and only the surplus would be shipped to China. (It is unclear how Taihe would make money by selling the fish in Madagascar, a low-income country, and Ratsiferana did not reply to a question from Mongabay on this subject.) They also said that each individual project within the framework agreement would be subject to an environmental impact assessment.However, civil society groups are still not satisfied that the deal was made in a fair and transparent manner. “The AMDP failed to answer our most important questions,” Frédéric Lesné, head of advocacy at Transparency International (TI) – Madagascar Initiative, told Mongabay after attending the meeting.On Friday, TI and other civil society groups announced their ongoing opposition to the deal, saying the AMDP had no experience in the fisheries sector, had refused to disclose information about Taihe, and had not made any social or environmental impact studies public.The AMDP’s Ratsiferana told Mongabay that critical civil society groups had shown “great naïveté” and that opposition to the deal was politically motivated. “During the electoral period in Madagascar, the [online petition] signatories, and first and foremost Transparency International (TI), were manipulated by interests and political issues that go beyond them,” Ratsiferana told Mongabay, referring to the upcoming presidential elections. (TI declined to respond to this claim, saying it had no basis in fact.)Fishermen in southwestern Madagascar carry a pirogue to the sea. Image by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.What is the AMDP?Critics of the deal have also expressed concern about the AMDP’s unusual structure and unclear relationship to the Madagascar government and to then-president and current candidate Rajaonarimampianina.As president, Rajaonarimampianina officially launched the AMDP at the headquarters of the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie in Paris in September 2016. Soon after, Madagascar hosted an international francophone summit, where the AMDP acted on behalf of the government to facilitate economic partnerships with other French-speaking countries. The group’s name, which identifies it as an “agency,” also implies that it is a government body.In the AMDP’s press release from Beijing in September, Rajaonarimampianina voiced his support for the fisheries deal — “the new silk roads run through Madagascar!” he said — and was one of a handful of people in the room when the deal was signed. The AMDP attached a photograph of the hand-shaking scene to the release, and Rajaonarimampianina can be seen at the back, in the middle.When questioned about the deal by Radio France Internationale (RFI), Rajaonarimampianina claimed not to know about it.Rajaonarimampianina has another tie to the AMDP: His son, Lovatiana Mickaël Rakotoarimanana, was on the AMDP’s board of directors when it was founded in 2016. (In an email to Mongabay, the AMDP’s Ratsiferana said Rakotoarimanana was no longer on the board.)Despite the AMDP’s work on behalf of the government and connections to the presidency, Ratsiferana said it was a “private association” and thus had no legal obligation to release a copy of the fisheries deal to the public.“[N]ot being a state-to-state agreement, but a protocol between private sectors and companies, we are bound to an obligation of confidentiality and private business secrecy,” Ratsiferana told Mongabay. “Have you ever seen in the press a publication of the agreement between Exxon and Aramco in the oil sector?” (Aramco, a state-owned oil company in Saudi Arabia, is notorious for its opacity.)But without a governmental mandate, it’s unclear how a private association like the AMDP could sign a deal of this scope, which will require, at the very least, a series of permits from the national environment office and licenses from the fisheries ministry. In response to a question regarding the AMDP’s authority to make such a sweeping international deal, Ratsiferana said, “The reality on the ground confirms a socio-economic backwardness in Madagascar and the need of the Malagasy population is clear: a better life. The AMDP is responding to this need.”The deal has drawn a lot of attention in local media and on social-media platforms, with many observers assuming corruption was a factor, or that the AMDP sold access to the president’s office. However, there is no direct evidence for either of these claims, and the AMDP has vigorously denied them. “I have not touched a single dollar,” Ratsiferana told RFI. “Neither me, nor the AMDP, nor Hery Rajaonarimampianina. I give you my word.”The president’s office, occupied in the interim by Rivo Rakotovao, a Rajaonarimampianina ally, declined to comment for this article. The AMDP declined to provide contact information for Taihe, and Mongabay was unable to reach the Beijing-based company, which has no online presence.Hery Rajaonarimampianina, who is running for reelection in this week’s presidential elections in Madagascar, spoke in London in 2015. Image courtesy of Chatham House via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).Foreign pressure on local fisheriesGlobally, China has the world’s largest fishing fleet. Chinese fishing companies, heavily subsidized by the government, have developed a reputation for overexploiting stocks and signing deals that lack transparency, or just not signing them at all. The vast majority of fishing by Chinese vessels goes unreported, amounting to about 2.5 million tons of catch per year around Africa alone, according to a 2012 European Union report.The Chinese fishing industry already had a presence in Madagascar prior to the signing of the agreement with the AMDP. Six Chinese vessels have been trawling for demersal and pelagic fish off southwest Madagascar since October 2017, according to the fisheries ministry. Small-scale fishers in the area say they feel the impact of the trawling on their catches, even from this relatively small fleet.“We mustn’t forget that with the arrival of just six industrial fishing boats in the Toliara region this year, some communities are already struggling to make ends meet,” Hermany Emoantra, a small-scale fisher in southwest Madagascar and Mihari’s president, said in the group’s statement. “So, imagine what could happen with 330 boats — how will these people live, where will they go?”Officially, these six are the only Chinese vessels working Madagascar’s waters, but the real number is believed to be much higher. Reports in the news and from local observers indicate that a large number of Chinese ships are working there illegally, sometimes using highly destructive fishing methods and strong-arm tactics to muscle local fishers off the water.But Madagascar’s small-scale fishers also face competition beyond the Chinese, for example from domestic and foreign industrial shrimp trawling and long-line tuna fishing by vessels from South Korea, Seychelles and Europe.Indeed, civil society groups are closely scrutinizing renegotiations of an EU fishing deal with Madagascar, which is due to expire at the end of the year. Fisheries experts have criticized past deals for prioritizing the profits of private EU companies over the interests of Malagasy people, and for lacking transparency. Late last month, Mihari and TI sent an open letter to both the Madagascar fisheries ministry and the EU asking for greater transparency and more cooperation with civil society groups during this round of negotiations.The fisheries deals with both the Europeans and the Chinese will be subject to at least an implicit approval by an incoming administration, which could quash them by denying foreign companies the necessary permits or licenses. So for Malagasy fishers, as for other sectors of society, much will depend on the results of the presidential election.A fishing boat in the town of Beheloke in southwestern Madagascar. Image by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.Banner image: A fishing boat in the town of Beheloke in southwestern Madagascar. Image by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Rebecca Kesslercenter_img Biodiversity Hotspots, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, Corporate Responsibility, Corporations, Developing Countries, Environment, Environmental Economics, Finance, Fish, Fishing, Governance, Green, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Poverty last_img read more

Asiatic black bear cubs rescued from illegal wildlife trade in Vietnam

first_imgAnimal Rescue, Animal Welfare, Animals, Bears, Crime, Environment, Illegal Trade, Mammals, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Rehabilitation, Wildlife Rescues, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Vietnamese authorities confiscated the two female bear cubs from wildlife smugglers in Hai Phong province on January 9, according to Vienna, Austria-based animal welfare NGO Four Paws.After spending a night in a hotel, the cubs were taken to a Four Paws bear sanctuary in Ninh Binh on January 10, where they are receiving intensive medical care.Authorities do not know who was meant to buy the bear cubs or where their ultimate destination was. It’s likely that the bears were imported from Laos, though they could also have come from a bear farm in Vietnam. Two Asiatic black bear cubs have been rescued from the illegal wildlife trade in Vietnam.Vietnamese authorities confiscated the two female bear cubs from wildlife smugglers in Hai Phong province on January 9, according to Vienna, Austria-based animal welfare NGO Four Paws. The rescue operation was a collaborative effort between Vietnamese police, Four Paws, local NGO ENV (Education for Nature-Vietnam), and Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand. The cubs’ origin has not been determined, and their mother has not been found.After spending a night in a hotel, the cubs were taken to a Four Paws bear sanctuary in the city of Ninh Binh in northern Vietnam on January 10, where they are receiving intensive medical care. Four Paws’ Vietnam Animal Manager, Emily Lloyd, said in a statement that both bear cubs weighed just 900 grams and were dehydrated when they arrived, so the group’s team of veterinarians is providing the cubs with milk fortified with vitamins and probiotics.“The bears are still very young, and the situation is critical, but we will do everything we can for their survival,” Lloyd said.Two bear cubs have been rescued from wildlife smugglers in Hai Phong province, Vietnam. Photo Credit: © FOUR PAWS.Authorities do not know who was meant to buy the bear cubs or where their ultimate destination was. It’s likely that the bears were imported from Laos, though they could also have come from a bear farm in Vietnam, Four Paws said.Though bear bile extraction has been outlawed in Vietnam since 2005, it’s believed there are still as many as 1,000 bears being held in captivity on bile farms in the country. Four Paws said that research has shown that many bears are still used for bile extraction and that the illegal trade of bear bile is still ongoing in Vietnam.Bear bile is used by practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine to treat a range of ailments, from hangovers to liver conditions and cancer. A decline in the demand for farmed bile that began in 2010 has led to fears of a mass die-off of Vietnam’s captive bears as bile farmers are no longer able to afford to keep the animals.The Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) is listed as Vulnerable to extinction on the IUCN Red List. “Habitat loss due to logging, expansion of agriculture and plantations, roadway networks and dams, combined with hunting for skins, paws and especially gall bladders are the main threats to this species,” the IUCN reports.Two rescued Asiatic black bear cubs are cared for by FOUR PAWS staff in Hai Phong province, Vietnam. Photo Credit: © Hoang Le | FOUR PAWS.CITATION• Garshelis, D. & Steinmetz, R. 2016. Ursus thibetanus (errata version published in 2017). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T22824A114252336. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T22824A45034242.en. Downloaded on 15 January 2019. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more