CC reunites Sorenstam, Wilson

first_imgLEHI — When the 11th annual Sorenson Champions Challenge tees off today, it will be a reunion of sorts for two golfers, Annika Sorenstam and Dean Wilson.It was back in 2003 that Sorenstam made history by becoming the first woman to play in a men’s PGA Tour event at the Colonial Invitational in Texas. While Sorenstam gained a lot of notoriety for her effort, so did Wilson.The former BYU golfer was one of her partners for her two rounds, and he received praise for the way he welcomed Sorenstam and made her feel comfortable in the all-male domain.”It was a funny way to meet,” said Sorenstam Monday before she teed off in the pro-am. “We’ve kept in touch, and I look forward to playing with him again.”Sorenstam and Wilson tee off today at 10 a.m. in the $475,000 two-person scramble tournament with Sorenstam playing with her sister, Charlotta, and Wilson teamed with PGA Tour regular Charley Hoffman who is a friend of Wilson’s in Las Vegas. Wilson’s regular partner, Mike Weir, with whom he won the event in 2003 and 2004, had a conflict this week.”It’s good to see her again and it will be fun,” said Wilson, who noted that they played together in a golf event about three years ago.”It’s great. We’ve sent text messages to each other. Every time she’d win a tournament, I’d give her a call and I think she won 10 times that year after we played together. She called me when I won.”Sorenstam is excited to be playing with her sister, who also plays on the LPGA Tour, calling it “sisterly love on the golf course again.”Earlier this year, Sorenstam announced that this will be her last year of competitive golf. She didn’t say whether this would be her last appearance at the Champions Challenge, but she plans to go out with a bang this year on the LPGA Tour.”I’m playing consistent golf right now and I’ve won three times already,” she said. “I’m very happy. My last year is going to be great.””I know she’ll be staying busy,” Charlotta said. “I’m impressed the way she did it, going out on top. She deserves it. She works hard.”The other group likely to garner a lot of attention today is the final group with Jack Nicklaus and his son, Mike, and Johnny Miller and his son, Scott.Johnny had to miss Monday’s pro-am because he had to stay in San Diego for the exciting playoff between Tiger Woods and Rocco Mediate. He rushed home Monday night to be at the pro-am dinner and will play today.Several former champions are in the field including Billy and Bobby Casper, who won the inaugural tournament in 1998, Craig Stadler, who won in 1999, Dave Stockton and Dave Stockton Jr., who won in 2000, Wilson who won in 2003 and 2004 with Mike Weir, Jason Zuback and Bobby Wilson, the long-drive champions who are teaming up again and Mike Reid, who won last year with Mark O’Meara.This year Reid will play with his son, Daniel, who recently returned from an LDS mission. Stadler, who won with son Kevin in ’99, will play with his son Chris this time. Other teams include Hale and Steve Irwin, Ian Baker-Finch and Jack Nicklaus II, and Andy and Todd Miller.The winning team will earn $100,000 and each team will win at least $20,000.Utah Jazz point guard Deron Williams will play in a special celebrity pairing at 8:40 a.m. with sponsor Jim Sorenson, comedian Gary Mule Deer, professional Joe Taggert and amateur Steele DeWald. The tournament sponsor is the Sorenson Group, a real estate development company. The official charities are the ANNIKA Foundation and art works for kids. Related E-mail: sor@desnews.comcenter_img Sorenson Champions Challenge schedulelast_img read more

Utah Utes basketball: Foul woes handcuff Utes’ star

first_img Wildcats’ pressure too much for Utes Related MIAMI — Perhaps the worst thing that could have happened to the Utah basketball team in its NCAA first-round game against Arizona was for center Luke Nevill to get in foul trouble.It hadn’t happened much this year, as Nevill had only fouled out once and had played at least 30 minutes in 19 of the last 20 Ute games.So what happened Friday night?Nevill picked up two fouls in the first four minutes and two more early in the second half and ended up either sitting or playing defense like a guy wearing handcuffs, while playing 27 minutes.”I thought I was playing good ‘D,’ ” said Nevill “I had my hands up in the air. They just happened. Sometimes you play in games and get calls that you may not agree with, but that’s the way it goes.”Utah coach Jim Boylen said before the game that he would know early how the game would be officiated, and he didn’t like it.”The first two calls were a little soft,” Boylen said. “We don’t like games called too tightly. I want a free-flowing game where we can hit people and play. I don’t think the referees did a poor job, but you have to adjust to that. I thought they called it pretty tight from the start and that’s not the best thing for us.”Nevill got his fourth foul with 14:38 left in the game, and although he came back in for the final 11 minutes, he couldn’t play with his usual defensive presence.TOO HUMID: Coming off their worst 3-point shooting game of the season against San Diego State last week (2-of-15), the Utes weren’t much better against Arizona, shooting 8-of-32 from behind the arc.Boylen defended the number of attempts, seven more than their season high, saying, “I didn’t think we took a whole lot of bad shots. Did we take some quick shots? Yeah. We’ve taken quick shots all year.”When asked about all the Ute basket tries that seemed two roll around and out, Boylen replied, “It’s the humidity — we’re not used to it. Plus we play with adidas basketballs.”Then after saying he was kidding, Boylen said, “They just didn’t go in.”Shaun Green, who is in the record books as one of the best 3-point shooters in Ute history, only made 2-of-11, with several shots going in and out. “A lot of the balls just didn’t bounce our way,” he said.WHERE’S THE FANS?: Back in the 1980s, Utah didn’t always fill the Huntsman Center for its NCAA first- and second-round games. Still, there were always 13,000 to 14,000 fans on hand for each of the sessions. However, the last few times Utah hosted the NCAAs, there were sellouts on a regular basis. Judging by the games on TV so far this week, there are a lot of empty seats are many of the venues, and that is certainly the case here at the American Airlines Arena.For the first two games of the day, there were a lot of empty seats and, with the draped upper-deck seats, perhaps about 10,000 fans were on hand in the 19,000-seat arena. For Utah’s game with Arizona, the first game of the evening session, there were tons of empty orange and red seats, which gradually became occupied before the game ended. No official attendance figures were given for the Utah-Arizona game, but for the Cleveland State-Wake Forest game, the attendance was listed as 8,990.ANOTHER 12-5 UPSET: Almost every year since the NCAA Tournament was expanded to 64 teams 25 years ago, there’s been an upset in the 5 vs. 12 seed game. Coming into this year, it had happened 31 times, once more than an upset in the 6 vs. 11 game.Utah was obviously hoping No. 12 Western Kentucky’s victory over Illinois got rid of the curse of the 5th seed for this year. But it didn’t happen and not only did the Utes lose, but No. 5 Florida State lost to Wisconsin later in the evening. Purdue was the only No. 5 seed to win, edging Northern Iowa by five points.GAME NOTES: Utah’s 20 turnovers tied their season high against UNLV in late February. … This was Utah’s first NCAA appearance since 2005 and first first-round loss since the 58-51 loss to Boston College in 2004.e-mail: sor@desnews.comlast_img read more

Budgets: a balance game

first_imgAfter last year’s football team went undefeated and was invited to play in the Sugar Bowl, the University of Utah received an unexpected boost of $1.6 million to its athletic program. Yet, despite that unforeseen windfall, just four years after netting another $2.5 million from a Fiesta Bowl appearance, the Utah athletic department is facing a shortfall of approximately $250,000 at the end of this fiscal year. And next year could be even worse, says Utah athletic director Chris Hill.”It’s what keeps me awake at night,” Hill said.Such is the state of college athletics, which is facing the same economic challenges as the rest of American society. Last month, Mountain West Conference member New Mexico announced that it would be making 10 percent cuts across the board. A story last week in the New York Times listed several schools, including Washington, Massachusetts, Cincinnati and Stanford, that would be cutting teams to save money on their budgets.Despite cutbacks around the country, a report commissioned by the NCAA that was released last month showed that major college programs bumped their spending by nearly 11 percent annually, more than double the average rise in universities’ overall spending. Top-tier Football Bowl Subdivision schools increased their spending from $31 million in 2004 to $42 million in 2007. That’s more than the entire athletic budgets for the six four-year universities in Utah, which are each having to make cutbacks in order to cope in these tough economic times. Coaches’ salaries are escalating, travel costs are higher and donations have diminished. It all adds up to a quandary for athletic departments.While only Utah and Utah State will admit to finishing in the red this year, none of the other four schools are rolling in cash. Each is right on the edge of losing money and still might before the end of the fiscal year on July 1.At BYU, athletic director Tom Holmoe says his department has had to scale back in several areas, but he doesn’t anticipate a deficit this year thanks to a reserve fund from recent successful years he’ll be able to dip into. Weber State has already laid off two people from a staff about half as big as Utah’s and BYU’s. Southern Utah has the added challenge of a new sport next fall (women’s volleyball), which will cost an extra couple of hundred thousand dollars.At Utah Valley, the department has made two significant budget cuts this year and faces increased costs as it joins a new conference next year.Worst off is Utah State with a deficit approaching a million dollars. First-year athletic director Scott Barnes is excited about a recently passed student referendum, which will add $2 million per year to USU athletics, but he says even that won’t be enough to keep the Aggies above water in the long term.”Running an athletic department is a lot more expensive than people realize,” said Utah’s Hill, who has run Utah’s successful athletic program for two decades. Utah’s athletic budget is around $27 million, up $5 million from five years ago and approximately triple what it was when Hill took the job 20 years ago.The university relies on donations from boosters, revenue from three sports — football, men’s basketball and women’s gymnastics — and student fees. Utah gets some institutional help, but less than most schools, according to Hill. Despite the extra money from the Sugar Bowl and generous donors, Ute athletics won’t make money this year.”We’ll be about $200,000 to $300,000 in the red,” Hill said. “We’ll use some of our bowl money to pay that deficit this year. That’s going to help get us through next year also.”While Utah hasn’t had to lay off staff, “we’ve pretty much told everybody, ‘Hey, there’s no budget increases this year, no salary increases,’ ” Hill said. “We’re cutting out as many things as we can, and we’ve asked our coaches to keep a flat budget or reduce in certain areas.”One thing that might be noticed by Utah fans is the elimination of the annual Fan Fest in August, which brings coaches and players together to interact with fans. Although the popular event has several sponsors, including the Deseret News, it costs the U. $20,000. Hill said other possible cutbacks might include a printed newsletter for fans, no outside speakers for the student-athlete conference, putting media guides online or reducing the offseason for nontraditional sports such as soccer, softball and volleyball.However, of the latter, that wouldn’t be done unless there was some NCAA legislation for all schools. “Unilaterally disarming is a difficult thing,” Hill said.When asked if any of the 100-plus athletic department staff has been cut, Hill replied, “Not yet,” indicating that it could happen next year when things are expected to get tougher.At Utah State, despite another projected deficit, there is optimism thanks to a successful men’s basketball program under Stew Morrill, a renewed hope for football under new coach Gary Andersen and an athletic director who is trying to upgrade the program while being handcuffed with one of the smallest budgets among Football Bowl Subdivision schools.”We already fund most of our programs at a minimum level,” Barnes said. “So we’ve had to really focus on overhauling our funding model. We’ve run a deficit for so long, our funding model was broke.”Barnes compares his budget to a three-legged stool — self-generated funds, institutional support and student fees.”When you compare a school like ours to Utah or BYU, our ability for self-generated revenue is not at the same level,” he said. “Our alumni base isn’t as large and our markets aren’t as large and prosperous for us to generate that kind of revenue.”Because of that, USU has had to rely more on student fees and institutional support. The referendum to increase student fees enough to put $2 million into the athletic budget was controversial on campus but vital for Utah State to remain a viable FBS (formerly called Division I) school. “We were fortunate to get a student referendum passed on our campus, which will certainly answer one of the three,” Barnes said. “But all along we’ve said it isn’t the total answer to our problems, just one piece of the puzzle. We have to all work harder and smarter in self-generated area. We’re getting closer but we’re not there yet.”Barnes said they’ve overhauled the entire development operations at USU, created a new model for selling season tickets and found creative ways for generating external revenues.USU employees already participated in a five-day furlough to save money, and Barnes is looking at any means to save more, including eliminating land lines, making media guides paperless and cutting back on administrative travel. “We’re saving tens of thousands, but not millions like we need,” he said. “At a time like this, it’s even more difficult to generate those external revenues, but we have seen progress.”The Aggies have always relied on “guarantee” games in football, which has often hurt the program because of too many early-season losses. Barnes wants to continue those games on a limited basis under a new scheduling philosophy but adds, “We want to be smarter.”Future Aggie schedules will include one guarantee game, one FCS (formerly Division I-AA) game at home, a game with either Utah or BYU and a game against a regional FBS school.This year the Aggies will play at Texas A&M, next year at Oklahoma and in 2011 at Auburn. The latter game will be at the market rate of $950,000, nearly double the Oklahoma guarantee, a big addition to the USU budget. BYU has the largest athletic budget in the state at just over $30 million, but it also has the most sponsored intercollegiate sports with 21.Holmoe said he hasn’t had to cut any programs or people, although the athletic department is participating in a campuswide hiring freeze. He’s grateful for recent surpluses, which will help subsidize the program during the tough times.”Instead of telling each team you can do that and can’t do that, we’re asking them to voluntarily reduce their budgets in the best way they can,” he said. “And we’ve had very good response.”The Cougars rely a lot on revenue from their nearly always sold-out 65,000-seat football stadium and from generous boosters. But in a down economy, they can’t always rely on that money.”Private donations and ticket sales are a such a big part of our revenue, and so far ticket sales are going very well,” Holmoe said. “If it wasn’t for this economy, we would probably continue to raise ticket prices, but we froze our ticket sales this year for football in an effort to show understanding to our fans.”Recent “up” years have given BYU a nice rainy-day fund, which is helping this year.”We’re spending some of the reserves, but hopefully not all of it,” Holmoe said. “Time will tell. We’ve projected to have a small surplus. If our coaches and administrators keep to the budget level and we are able to prognosticate what our revenue will be, then we’ll be in good shape.”Holmoe said because of the tough times, plans for some facilities have been delayed.”We have some real nice plans for the future that are put on hold for the time being,” he said. “For instance, we don’t know when we’ll get to the next phase for our soccer stadium. We’ll continue planning, but they won’t come to fruition for a while.”Of all the in-state schools, Weber State is the only one that has actually had to lay off staff in recent months, including one in marketing. Jerry Graybeal, who has been athletic director for nearly four years, said his school tries to find ways to save money without jeopardizing the experience of the student-athletes or handcuffing the coaches.One of the main things Weber has looked at is travel costs. “We’ve tried to look at streamlining our costs for travel,” said Graybeal. “That’s a big one. Everyone got hit last year with the explosion of oil prices. It’s expensive to travel regardless, but when possible we try to substitute a bus trip for a plane ride.”For example, the Weber State football team will take four bus trips this year and just two plane trips. In the past, the Wildcats have usually bused up to Montana or Montana State and always to Pocatello and flown elsewhere.This year, besides busing to Missoula, the Wildcats will get quite familiar with I-80, with bus trips for games at Wyoming, Colorado State and Northern Colorado. “This year we’ll only have two flights, Portland State and Eastern Washington, and that will help us,” Graybeal said. “We already pretty much travel bare bones anyway.”Graybeal said his department has even considered not ordering new uniforms and looked at all costs associated with game management.”We ask, ‘Does this create a burden for the student-athletes?’ ” he said. “We try to avoid that at all possible. Internally, our challenge is to provide the same service with fewer people.”Southern Utah has saved money by consolidating some positions within the athletic department.Athletic director Ken Beazer said the school’s compliance person also picked up academics and the employee over fundraising and a booster club also picked up corporate sponsorships and marketing. He even used a student intern to actually take over game management.”She sat at the table and called the games,” he said. “She didn’t get paid, but she’s leaving with a degree and experience, which will help her walk right into a job.”Beazer said more than 90 percent of his budget goes to three areas — salaries, scholarships and travel — with each accounting for about a third of the total.”We don’t have much fat to trim,” he said. SUU has an exorbitant travel budget being in the Summit Conference, which consists of schools mostly in the Midwest. So not only must the T-Birds bus a few hours to Las Vegas to catch a flight, they often have connecting flights plus more bus rides to places like Moline, Ill., or Fargo, N.D.”The party line I’ve been using,” said Beazer, “is this: We’re very happy with the conference and the relationships, but we would like something to make more sense geographically.”Utah Valley has only been a university for four years and will be joining the Great West Conference next year after being an independent for several years.Athletic director Mike Jacobsen said UVU is mandated to break even with its $6.5 million budget but has had to take some “pretty significant budget cuts this year” to do that. “We didn’t re-hire at a couple of positions, so we’re going to be OK,” Jacobsen said. “We eliminated most all of administrative travel and we changed the way we travel a little bit. We watch the way we eat, make sure we’re not paying any extra fees on baggage and maybe put two in a room instead of one. We’re just being a little more frugal.” Even though UVU is joining a conference, it won’t help its travel budget since it has been playing most of the same teams already. “It’s not going to change much,” Jacobsen said. “We’re still going to the East and Midwest — our regional schools won’t play us. It forces us to make long trips. Sometimes we’ve played a single game, so we’re going to pick up another game when we make a big-time trip. It’s the smart, economic thing to do.”Utah Valley has the highest fees for students in the state, but according to Jacobsen, there are few complaints from the students. “They love it,” he said. “They love our athletic program.”So what does the future hold for the Beehive State’s athletic programs?While there are a lot of worries among the athletic directors, there’s still an overall feeling of optimism.”Next year is really going to be a tremendous financial challenge,” said Hill. “On the income side we’re lacking a money game like we had with Michigan and we’re not raising ticket prices. We’re projecting our contributions to be flat and costs continue to go up. We’re looking to have a very rough next year and using most of our reserve fund, just to balance.””The big challenge that remains to be seen is revenue,” said Holmoe. “There are a few things we’ve planned for that we think are very important so certain areas of our budget we have increased and certain areas we’ve backed down. We don’t have a huge fear, but we’re going into it carefully. We don’t want to shut down anything. We want to do the things that will not cause us to fall back.”Weber State is happy to be getting nearly a half-million dollars for its two games at Wyoming and Colorado State this fall that will help the future budget.”It’s a tough schedule, but they’re both games we can bring a good portion of the money back and hopefully pay it forward for years to come,” said Graybeal.Beazer said, “I fully anticipate it to be more difficult for us because we’re bringing volleyball on line. We’ve pushed our programs so far, adding women’s golf two years ago and increased scholarships for most of our sports. We’ve been pushing and pushing; I just hope we haven’t outrun our supply line. Any more unforeseen expenses could really force some tough decisions.””I know expenses are going to go up next year, but our budget will be pretty much the same, so we’ll have to make it work within that same realm,” said Jacobsen. “We hope we don’t get in a situation where we have to make bigger cuts than we have to this point, but right now we’re going to be OK and make some adjustments with what we do have.”If any school has reason to worry, it’s Utah State, but Barnes is staying upbeat about the future.”Even given the economic challenges, we’ve got tremendous momentum in our program and the light at the end of the tunnel with student fees and self-generated revenue is up substantially,” he said. “I view this as a short time period of tremendous challenge. We’ve just got to be strong and vigilant in executing our plan and we’ll get through it.”E-mail: sor@desnews.comlast_img read more

Utes hang on for first win at Stanford in 48 years with 70-66 victory

first_imgSTANFORD, Calif. — The last time the Utah basketball team won a game at Stanford, Larry Krystkowiak was just a young lad living near Glacier National Park in Montana. It was clear back in 1971 when the Utes took an eight-point victory over the Cardinal.Finally all these years later, the Utes broke a losing streak that included five straight losses here in Pac-12 play since 2012 with a 70-66 victory Thursday night at Maples Pavilion.Coach Krystkowiak said he addressed the Pac-12 drought before the game, telling his team that Stanford and Arizona were the only two places in conference play the Utes hadn’t won over the past seven seasons.“We talked about it before the game that there were a couple of places we hadn’t won,” he said. “It was a team effort, and everybody was engaged.”“That was a lot of fun, Coach K’s first win at Stanford,” said Sedrick Barefield, who was the Utes’ hero with three big 3-pointers and four free throws down the stretch. “Being able to say we did that is a really cool thing.”It didn’t come easy as the Utes overcame what Krystkowiak called some “atrocious” offense with some strong defense at the other end.That was a lot of fun, Coach K’s first win at Stanford. – Utah guard Sedrick BarefieldThe Utes kept Stanford from scoring three times in the final 25 seconds as they hung on for their second road victory in Pac-12 play and improved to 4-2 in the league and 10-8 overall.Barefield led the Utes with 18 points on 5-of-9 shooting, including 4 of 5 from 3-point range and 4 of 4 from the free-throw line. Donnie Tillman added 11 points off the bench, Parker Van Dyke scored 10 and Jayce Johnson and Both Gach each scored nine points, with Johnson grabbing a team-high 11 rebounds.KZ Opala, who had missed the last game at Washington State with back spasms, was tough for the Utes to stop all night as he finished with 22 points for Stanford. Daejon Davis added 17 points, while Josh Sharma had nine points and 12 rebounds.Utah took a 31-26 lead into halftime after trailing for much of the initial 20 minutes.The Utes got off to a sloppy start and trailed early before tying the game at 18 on a lay-up by Tillman. Then with his team down 23-20, Van Dyke hit back-to-back 3-pointers from out front and the right corner to put the Utes on top. After the Cardinal tied it, Barefield hit a 3-pointer from the top and then Timmy Allen scored his first points of the game with a short shot just before the buzzer.In the second half, the Cardinal came out strong and looked to be in control for a while as they led by six points at 54-48 with 7:51 left on a bucket by Davis.Then after Charles Jones scored for Utah, Barefield hit back-to-back 3-pointers from out front within a 30-second span to put the Utes up 56-54 at the 5:24 mark.It was 60-60 when Barefield hit another big three from out front, although this one didn’t swish and bounced around the rim a couple of times before finally falling.After Okpala tied it with a three, Van Dyke scored on a drive to put the Utes up for good at 65-63 with 57 seconds left. Okpala could only make one of two free throws with 39 seconds left and then came an “interesting” play when Stanford fouled Barefield immediately.Not only did they have nearly 40 seconds left, enough time to get the ball back with 10 seconds or so, but they also fouled perhaps Utah’s best free-throw shooter (83.6 percent on the year).“That was a little interesting,” said Krystkowiak. “I don’t know if they were going for a steal or trying to foul him. It certainly gives us, on a night like tonight, our best opportunity to put points on the board because we hadn’t dazzled anybody up until that point. So that was big.”Barefield sank both to put the Utes up by three, and then after Sharma made two free throws at the 24-second mark, Barefield was fouled again and sank two with 22 seconds left.Stanford couldn’t convert on a lay-up try with 16 seconds left, and Johnson sank one of two free throws for the final margin.The Utes will try to get another road win Saturday night when they take on Cal at Haas Pavilion in an 8 p.m. MST game.last_img read more

After embarrassing loss last year, Utah embarrasses Arizona State with lights-out defensive performance

first_img Utah Utes running back Zack Moss (2) is wrapped up at the line of scrimmage by Arizona State Sun Devils defensive linemen Roe Wilkins (95) and Jermayne Lole (90) during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes linebacker Devin Lloyd (20) leads the Utes onto the field before the start of an NCAA football game against the Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Utah Utes running back Zack Moss (2) runs around the defensive line during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. SALT LAKE CITY — Ever since Utah joined the Pac-12 eight years ago, Arizona State has been a thorn in the Utes’ side. Nobody has beaten Utah more than the Sun Devils, who like USC and Washington, have six wins over the Utes. The last two years were especially embarrassing for the Utes, who lost to the Sun Devils by a combined 38 points, while allowing 68 points.So what did the Utes do to make up for it this year?“Obviously last year’s game against those guys left a sour taste in our mouths. We wanted to get that out. We were sitting on it for a year so it was about time to let it loose.” — Utah defensive coordinator Morgan ScalleyThey turned the tables and simply embarrassed the Sun Devils, holding them to their lowest point total in 11 years and keeping them from setting a modern FBS record for most consecutive games scoring double-digit points (they had 125 straight double-digit games, which was tied with Louisiana Tech).After the game, coach Utah coach Kyle Whittingham gushed, “I can’t remember a better defensive effort, certainly not as of late. Our defense was lights-out tonight.”Ute defensive coordinator Morgan Scalley gave all the credit to the players and said they had extra motivation after what happened last year in Tempe when Arizona State rolled up 536 yards and 38 points on the Utes.This year, the Utes held the Sun Devils to exactly 400 fewer yards and 35 fewer points.“Obviously last year’s game against those guys left a sour taste in our mouths,” Scalley said. “We wanted to get that out. We were sitting on it for a year so it was about time to let it loose.” Utah Utes wide receiver Derrick Vickers (8) is hit by Arizona State Sun Devils linebacker Tyler Whiley (23) on a running play during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Arizona State came into this year’s game averaging 402 yards per game. Utah held them to 136 yards. ASU freshman quarterback Jayden Daniels, a player the Utes coveted out of high school, was averaging 268 yards per game passing. He got 25 against Utah’s stout defense, completing just 4 of 18 passes. About 10 of those passes were fired into the third row of the stands as he was scrambling all night and just trying to get rid of the ball. Daniels was also sacked three times, all by Utah’s defensive end Bradley Anae, who Whittingham called, the “best edge rusher in the Pac-12.” In fact, Whittingham was a prophet, telling Anae before the game that he was going to get three sacks in the game.ASU coach Herm Edwards, a former defensive star in the NFL, was certainly impressed by Utah’s defensive effort. “You have to give Utah a lot of credit,” he said. “They put a lot of pressure on our quarterback. They found ways to get to him and he was under duress most of the day.”Before and during the game, all eyes were on Ute running back Zack Moss and his quest to break the career rushing record set by Eddie Johnson 31 years ago. It took until late in the fourth quarter for Moss to get past Johnson, but in the meantime, the Ute defense took center stage. Utah Utes linebacker Devin Lloyd (20) trips up Arizona State Sun Devils quarterback Jayden Daniels (5) and prevents him from going out of bounds near the end of the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes running back Zack Moss (2) runs past Arizona State Sun Devils defensive back Kobe Williams (5) during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Arizona State Sun Devils defensive back Chase Lucas (24) tries to reel in a tipped ball that was batted away by Utah Utes wide receiver Donte Banton (13) during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes defensive end Bradlee Anae (6) celebrates with the rest of the defensive line after stopping Arizona on third down during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes wide receiver Jaylen Dixon (25) dives for the first Utah touchdown during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson A shirtless Utes fan bellows into the rain during a break in play in the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. A shirtless Utes fan bellows into the rain during a break in play in the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Utah Utes quarterback Tyler Huntley (1) throws the ball during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Utah Utes tight end Cole Fotheringham (89) is flipped through the air by Arizona State Sun Devils defensive back Chase Lucas (24) during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Utah Utes defensive back Javelin Guidry (28) enters the field for warmups before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes linebacker Devin Lloyd (20) trips up Arizona State Sun Devils quarterback Jayden Daniels (5) and prevents him from going out of bounds near the end of the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes running back Zack Moss (2) runs around the defensive line during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes defensive back Julian Blackmon (23) warms up before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Colter Peterson Colter Peterson Colter Peterson Utah Utes running back Zack Moss (2) is wrapped up at the line of scrimmage by Arizona State Sun Devils defensive linemen Roe Wilkins (95) and Jermayne Lole (90) during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes defensive backs Jaylon Johnson, right, and Tareke Lewis warm up before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Colter Peterson Colter Peterson Utah Utes quarterback Jason Shelley (15) hurdles Arizona State Sun Devils linebacker Darien Butler (37) during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes defensive back Javelin Guidry (28) enters the field for warmups before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. A Utah Utes fan cheers as the team huddles up during warmups before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Grid View The Utah Utes celebrate during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes defensive end Bradlee Anae (6) celebrates with the rest of the defensive line after stopping Arizona on third down during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Utah Utes defensive back Terrell Burgess (26) warms up before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes defensive back Terrell Burgess (26) warms up before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Arizona State Sun Devils quarterback Jayden Daniels (5) lands on a wild snap during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Utah Utes running back Zack Moss (2) runs in the second Utah touchdown of the game against Arizona State Sun Devils linebacker Merlin Robertson (8) while quarterback Tyler Huntley (1) signals first down during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. The Utah Utes celebrate during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes tight end Cole Fotheringham (89) is flipped through the air by Arizona State Sun Devils defensive back Chase Lucas (24) during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Colter Peterson Utah Utes running back Zack Moss (2) runs in the second Utah touchdown of the game against Arizona State Sun Devils linebacker Merlin Robertson (8) while quarterback Tyler Huntley (1) signals first down during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes wide receiver Jaylen Dixon (25) dives for the first Utah touchdown during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Utah Utes quarterback Jason Shelley (15) hurdles Arizona State Sun Devils linebacker Darien Butler (37) during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Utah Utes defensive back Julian Blackmon (23) warms up before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes wide receiver Derrick Vickers (8) is hit by Arizona State Sun Devils linebacker Tyler Whiley (23) on a running play during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes defensive backs Jaylon Johnson, right, and Tareke Lewis warm up before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson A Utah Utes fan cheers as the team huddles up during warmups before the start of an NCAA football game between the Utah Utes and Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Arizona State Sun Devils quarterback Jayden Daniels (5) lands on a wild snap during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Utah Utes linebacker Devin Lloyd (20) leads the Utes onto the field before the start of an NCAA football game against the Arizona State Sun Devils at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Colter Peterson Utah Utes running back Zack Moss (2) runs past Arizona State Sun Devils defensive back Kobe Williams (5) during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Arizona State Sun Devils defensive back Chase Lucas (24) tries to reel in a tipped ball that was batted away by Utah Utes wide receiver Donte Banton (13) during the second half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. The Sun Devils only managed 21 yards in the first quarter. The second quarter was the same — 21 yards — giving them 42 at halftime. The only reason they were within shouting distance of Utah were two turnovers by the Utes, which kept it a two-touchdown game.In the third quarter, the Sun Devils finally got some rushing yards but again couldn’t find the end zone after a couple of Ute gifts — a fumble at their own 18-yard line and an interception returned to the Ute 28. In the first case, the Utes held ASU to a field goal and in the second, they pushed the Sun Devils back enough to force a punt.The Ute front four of Anae, Leki Fotu, John Penisini and Mika Tafua had Daniels running for his life all night. ASU running back Eno Benjamin did end up with 104 yards rushing, but 32 came on one run late in the game and the rest were hard-earned.The Utes came into the game as one of the top-ranked defenses in several categories and will only move up after Saturday’s stellar performance.“Hey, it’s on to next week,” Scalley said. “I’m proud of them. It’s all about the player — they were prepared. They owned it. They worked their tails off. They took pride in what they’re doing.” Utah Utes quarterback Tyler Huntley (1) throws the ball during the first half of an NCAA football game at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019.last_img read more

Wellington Police Notes: Monday, March 27, 2017

first_imgWellington Police notes: Monday, March 27, 2017•11:09 a.m. Officers took a report of found child’s sweatshirt in the 200 block N. C, Wellington.•11:14 a.m. Non-injury accident in the 100 block S. Washington, Wellington involving a vehicle operated by Reuben L. Wahl, 87, Wellington and a fixed object/building owned by Coffee House #7, Wellington.•1:21 p.m. Non-Injury accident in the 700 block N. U.S. 81, Wellington involving a vehicle operated by Robert L. Askew, 61, Viola and a parked and unoccupied vehicle owned by Bebermeyer Enterprises, LLC, Harper, Ks.•2:39 p.m. Officers took a report of a runaway in the 500 block S. F, Wellington.•3:25 p.m. Officers conducted a courtesy motor vehicle accident report in the 1700 block E. 16th, Wellington involving vehicles operated by juvenile female 16, Wellington and Jillian F. Wiley, 18, Wellington.•3:51 p.m. Officers investigated possession certain stimulants, possession of marijuana and possession drug paraphernalia in the 400 block N. Washington, Wellington.•5:45 p.m. Barry V. Rosenberg II, 33, Wellington was arrested and charged with possession of certain stimulants, possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.•9:10 p.m. Officers took a report of a family dispute in the 900 block N. Woodlawn, Wellington by known subject(s).last_img read more

James Hajek, 79, Caldwell: April 1, 1938 – March 11, 2018

first_imgJames HajekJames J. Hajek age 79 died on Sunday, March 11, 2018 at the Sumner County Hospital District #1 in Caldwell, KS.  He was born April 1, 1938 in Enid, OK to Frank and Arleen (Brown) Hajek.  He was a 1957 graduate to Caldwell High School.He married Wilma Scheihing in 1961.  He worked as a wheat and cattle farmer on the family farm.  He attended automotive school for two years and served his country for six years in the Army before returning to farming.  He enjoyed family vacations, camping and old steam tractors.  He built his own steam tractor for the ground up and traveled to numerous tractor shows sharing his love and interest in steam power.  Jim’s favorite pastime was to tinker in his shop repairing his farm equipment and imagining ways to make life on the farm easier by building a grain cleaner, stubble burner and various inventions.Family and friends knew him for his sense of humor.  He told jokes and pulled pranks on his friends for fun. He is survived by his wife Wilma, daughters Sandra Parsons (Bill) of West Siloam Springs, OK and Amy Hajek (Peter Perretti) of Ashville, NC; grandsons John Parsons, Joe Parsons and James Parsons and many nieces, nephews and cousins.Funeral services will be held 2:00 p.m. Thursday, March 15, at the Assembly of God Church in Caldwell, Caldwell, Kansas.  Interment will be in the Caldwell City Cemetery, Caldwell, Kansas.Memorials may be given in memory of Jim to the Sumner County Hospital District #1 and left in care of the mortuary.To share a memory or leave a condolence please visit www.schaeffermortuary.infoArrangements by Schaeffer Mortuary, 6 N. Main, Caldwell, Kansas.last_img read more

Billy Wayne Upton, 46, Wellington: Dec. 20, 1971 – May 26, 2018

first_imgBilly UptonBilly Wayne Upton, of Wellington, died Saturday, May 26, 2018 at his home in Wellington at the age of 46.Billy was born the son of Billy R. and Sherry (Bough) Upton on Monday, December 20, 1971 in Wichita.On July 3, 1991, Billy and Kimberley Mott were united in marriage in Wellington. Together they celebrated 26 years of marriage.Billy proudly served his country in the United States Air Force during Operation Desert Storm and served a year in Korea. He later began a career in aircraft and was employed at TECT Aerospace for over 10 years. Billy will be missed by all that knew and loved him.Survivors include his wife, Kimberley Upton of Wellington; parents, Billy R. and Sherry Upton of Derby, children: Madison M. Plymell and her husband Erik of Winfield,  Billy H.R. Upton and his wife Chelsea of Wichita,  Ian T. Upton and his wife Hollie of Wellington and Mackenzie M. Upton and her husband Bryson of Wellington,  grandchildren: Chloe M. Plymell, Benjamin M.L. Caudillo and Alexzander T.G. Upton and his sister, Jypsi M. Cook and her husband Ivan of South Haven. He was preceded in death by his grandparents: Mary and Elmer Weyand, James B. Upton and Iva and Charlie Bough. Visitation will be held at the funeral home from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m., Wednesday, May 30, 2018 with the family present from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.Funeral services for Billy will be held at 10 a.m., Thursday, May 31, 2018 at Grace Calvary Fellowship in Wellington. Interment with Military Honors will follow at the Kansas Veterans Cemetery in Winfield. A memorial fund has been established in his loving memory to Victory in the Valley. Contributions may be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.cornejodayfuneralhome.com.Arrangements are by Cornejo|Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more

(Updated 5:30 p.m.) Wheat 2018 Sumner Wheat Harvest is in full gear, but on Anson Road it could be over

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comment (1) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +2 Vote up Vote down southsideresident · 113 weeks ago Yes, I saw the combines out already out Saturday eve about 5:45 PM along Anson Rd when going to the John Chitwood Farms (red barn) for some good lively listening country/gospel music. No room for dancing though. Bunch of folks show up for supper and country entertainment. Report Reply 0 replies · active 113 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow – The 2018 Kansas Wheat Harvest is officially here.Farmers throughout the county got into their fields and started cutting wheat- in arguably the most important week of the year for Sumner County.According to the Kansas Wheat Commission Day 1 report just issued this afternoon, Mike Morlan from Progressive Ag Coop in Sumner and Harper counties, reports that they received some rain on Thursday of last week, so harvest really began on Friday. He estimates that the area is about halfway done with harvest and if it stays hot and dry they will be wrapped up in a week to 10 days.However, they are expecting a rain overnight which could slow things down. Acres in the area are reduced from average, so he says harvest is “not going to take long.” He reports that in Harper County, yields are averaging 25 bushels per acre, but in Sumner County they are about 35 bushels per acre. He says test weights are good, averaging a little over 60 pounds, and protein is average to slightly above average.Scott Van Allen, who farms in Sumner County, told the Kansas Wheat Commission that his harvest began on Saturday. Wheat in his area is short, with grass and weeds under the canopy. He says test weights have been good, ranging from 58-61 pounds, and yields so far are average, even a little better than he was expecting, averaging in the low 40s.Farmers across Sumner County were well on their way by late Sunday afternoon.  And harvesting up and down Anson Road was going at maximum pace. Anson Road is a handy strip of paved central Sumner County road going north and south, connecting the Wellington City Lake to, well, something up north.Four cutting operations were in full force on a four-mile stretch inside the Osborn Township from 10th St to 30th Ave.The farmers were were cutting wheat Sunday in this concentrated part of the world were:•Bert Neff Farms were just a block south of U.S. 160 had one combine rolling and second one on the way. •The Strand family were busy knocking out huge swaths of wheat on a field owned by Jean Marks trust•It really isn’t harvest until Becker Farms are out cutting wheat. There were a line of Massey combines to the north of the Strands. •Chitwood Farms most certainly had the most impressive combines of the bunch – running their Case IH 8120 combines through a field at 30th Ave. and Anson.As far as the wheat price? Let’s just keep this story on the positive.Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

Sumner Newscow tournament scoreboard roundup (Thursday…

first_imgBelle Plaine: Gooch 21, Wiseman 17, Bible 12, Hilton 9, Osgood 8, Zimmerman 5, Warren 5. Total 19 (9) 10-12 77 Mulvane138151450 Scoring: Updated tournament scores and schedule:Chaparral Roadrunner Classic (boys)First round Belle Plaine 77 Mulvane 50 (box score below)Clearwater 62 Chaparral 57 .Tonight:#2 Ark City (4-4) vs. #7 Conway Springs (2-7), 6 p.m.#3 Wellington (3-5) vs. #6 Clearwater (2-6), 8 p.m.South-Central Border League TournamentFirst round (girls): West Elk 54 Oxford 13South Haven 55 Sedan 27Caldwell 45 Flinthills 36Argonia 54 Udall 42Friday semifinals (at Cowley College)9th place — Cedar Vale-Dexter vs. Central – 2:30 p.m.Oxford vs. Sedan, 4 p.m.Flinthills vs. Udall, 5:30 p.m.West Elk vs. South Haven, 7 p.m.Caldwell vs. Argonia, 8:30 p.m.BoysSemifinals – Thursday at Cowley College.9th place – Argonia vs. Central, 2:30 p.m.#9 Oxford vs. #4 Sedan, 4 p.m.#7 Flinthills vs. #5 South Haven, 5:30 p.m.#1 Caldwell vs #5 West Elk, 7 p.m.#2 CV-Dexter vs. #3 Udall, 8:30 p.m.——— Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter. Belle Plaine1715301577 Chappy tourney1234Final Mulvane: Abasolo 15, Ellis 13, Manis 8, Gerlach 6, Horrman 6, Dye 2. Total: 13 (4) 12-17 50.last_img read more